Episode 15 Review

Star Trek Discovery Review Banner Episode 15

It’s taken me a long time to write this review, because, sadly, I didn’t like this episode.  I was so disappointed by it that I didn’t know how to put my feelings into words and I wasn’t inspired to put fingers to keyboard.

To be fair, I should point out that there are elements of “Will You Take My Hand?” that are great, but only elements – and only two or three that I can easily recall.  As a whole, it just doesn’t work and it is not a fitting end to what has been a remarkable season, and an outstanding first season.

As usual, the acting is brilliant and the special effects are impressive and these are the things that carry the episode.  The story doesn’t, and the writing is some of the worst this season has seen – which is surprising, considering who wrote it and the quality we know they can produce.

The other thing that really lets this episode down is the boring and suspense-less resolution to the Klingon war arc. This resolution makes you question the entire season and how well it was thought out, and it makes you question everything the writing team has been telling us because so many things seem unfulfilled.

Before I dive in further, spoilers ahead.  I’m only putting this warning up because of the last few scenes… so, Red Alert!

Spoiler Alert

The Facts
Episode Number: 115
Episode Title: “Will You Take My Hand?” or “Wasted Opportunities”
Written By: Gretchen J. Berg and Aaron Harberts
Story By: Akiva Goldsman, Gretchen J. Berg and Aaron Harberts
Directed By: Akiva Goldsman

Georgiou to Saru: “What’s wrong?  Are you scared, Number One?”  Beat.  “Where I’m from there’s a saying: ‘scared Kelpien makes for tough Kelpien’.  Have you gotten tough since we served together on the Shenzhou, Mr Saru?
Saru: “Affirmative, captain.  Very tough.  So much so that many find me simply unpalatable.

L’Rell: “You?  How!?  Our Lord pierced your heart… House T’Kuvma feasted on your flesh.
Georgiou: “You have the wrong Philippa Georgiou.
L’Rell: “Either way, I can tell you require seasoning.

Michael to Cornwell: “Is this how Starfleet wins the war?  Genocide?!
Cornwell: “You want to do this here?  Fine.  Terms of atrocity are convenient after the fact.  The Klingons are on the verge of wiping out the Federation.
Michael: “Yes, but ask yourself, why did you put this mission in the hands of a Terran, and why the secrecy?  It’s because you know it’s not who we are.
Cornwell: “It very soon will be.  We do not have the luxury of principles…
Michael: “That’s all we have, Admiral!”  Beat.  “A year ago, I stood alone.  I believed that our survival was more important than our principles.  I was wrong.”  Beat.  “Do we need a mutiny today to prove who we are?
Saru: (Standing) “We are Starfleet.
The entire bridge crew stands to join Michael and Saru.

Moments of Interest
Familiar Aliens
The Orions make an appearance in this episode and they’re just as fond of debauchery and hedonism as ever!  Though… they do appear a little paler than we’re used to!

Familiar Faces
Clint Howard, who made his first Star Trek appearance in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode “The Corbomite Maneuver,” makes another appearance in Trek, this time playing a very stoned Orion who tries to dupe Tilly.

Clint Howard DISCO

If you’re thinking Clint looks familiar, he has also appeared in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Past Tense, Part II” and the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Acquisition.”

Clint is also the brother of actor and legendary director Ron Howard, and is a regular at Star Trek conventions.

A Klingon Moon
During a confrontational moment on the Discovery after Michael works out what Starfleet is up, we see a hologram of Qo’nos blowing up (thanks to bad science and a lack of research around volcanos), and, I’m pretty sure, orbiting Qo’nos there in the background might be Praxis.

Extra Appendages
Speaking of Klingons, it would appear our favourite ridge-headed aliens have a little more going for them than redundant internal organs.  In another attempt to leave their  mark on Star Trek canon, the producers have given Klingon males two penises… peni?

Does this disturb anyone else?  I can’t help but think of poor Deanna and Jadzia!

Please believe me when I say I’m not being prudish here, merely practical.  How the heck does that work?  I get redundant internal organs, that has been canon since Star Trek: The Next Generation, but why would those redundancies also be external?  If we follow that logic, Klingon women should have two vaginas and four breasts and all Klingons should probably have two heads (and brains), two anuses and an extra arm each.

This addition to canon feels poorly thought out and completely unnecessary.

Will You Take My Hand - Planning to Infiltrate Qo'Nos

The Review
As I’m typing this, I’m watching the episode to catch quotes and re-familiarise myself with what happened, and for the first time I’m not paying rapt attention to the screen, forcing myself to type.  I’m listening, half-heartedly, and that bothers me.  It bothers me because I wish I didn’t have to re-watch this episode, and it’s rare that I want an episode of Star Trek to be over.

We begin this particular voyage with a look back at what’s come before, with L’Rell providing the “last time…” announcement in Klingon.

After the flashbacks, we go to an absolutely terrible scene on the bridge that serves no purpose whatsoever.  In it, Empress Philippa Georgiou does everything in her power to show everyone around her that she is not Captain Georgiou, devolving from a nuanced, intelligent villain into a stereotype – complete with clunky dialogue and bad attitude as she snaps at everyone from Owosekun to Detmer.  Michelle Yeoh is wonderful to watch, usually, but I didn’t enjoy these scenes.  Michelle did not do a bad job, but she was given rubbish lines that were silly and a waste of a talented actor.  We did not need to be reminded that this Georgiou is evil.  I can’t help but think that if she had pulled off a good impression of Captain Georgiou it would have been chilling – for us, and in particular for Michael and Saru.  To add insult to injury, she has a go at Michael for trying to expose her when she’s been doing everything she can to say “I’m not your Georgiou” – short of wearing a sign.

Evil Elmo

These first few scenes would have been better used showing us some of the war we’ve heard about but rarely seen.  Wasn’t it meant to be amping up this episode?  Or, it could have been used to show Cornwell and Sarek, back at Starfleet Headquarters, agonising over their decision to enlist a Mirror Universe tyrant to do the unthinkable.  Instead, we get moustache twirling and scenes that insult our intelligence as an audience.

From that dump of disappointment we head into the opening credits sequence and then a delightful little visit with L’Rell, where Georgiou continues to remind us of just how evil she is.

It was nice to see L’Rell again, but this is another scene that we didn’t need and the time would have been better spent addressing some of the loose threads from throughout the season – like what’s going to happen with the spore drive?  Has Vulcan been attacked?  Has Andor or Tellar fallen to the Klingon advance?  How is Stamets going with the death of the love of his life?  Is he miraculously healed now or is he still having mycelial inspired flashbacks?  Is Mirror-Georgiou a three-dimensional human being, or just a cardboard cut-out bad guy?  How are some of the lower decks guys we were supposed to be seeing more of coping with the whole war/Mirror Universe/war/stabby-McStabby-neck-snappy Ash?

We get none of that, as another missed opportunity passes us by at warp 8.

Fresh off watching Georgiou kick L’Rell around, we visit with Ash in what might be the worst scene of the entire season.  Georgiou gets her moustache out again and twirls it, as Michael looks on and Ash talks about knots.

Ash does share some useful stuff but really, all I can remember is the knots?  Knots.  He’s not even Ash.  Really.  Can we have this guy deal with being a Klingon in a false body-suit with a set of memories that have overridden who and what he originally was before we talk about a false memory from another guy who is probably dead?  There’s real meat in that.  But no.  We can’t.  Because knots.  Perhaps that’s a metaphor I’m not clever enough to get?

Disco S1E15 Tilly in the Orion Quarter

With Ash’s info in hand, we cut to the briefing room and the plot to jump inside the Klingon Homeworld so they can “map” it.  *Wink wink.*

Georgiou chooses her landing party, which consists of knot-loving Ash, Michael and Tilly, giving Mary Wiseman a chance to show off her incredible comic timing again, and then tells the guys to go dress like reprobates.

How do you do that?  You don black or dark brown leather and straighten your hair.  Nothing says evil like leather and people who usually have curly or wavy hair suddenly having straight hair.

The scene isn’t terrible.  Thanks to Mary Wiseman, it’s actually pretty good.  She takes what would have been an info dump, and turns it into something delightful.

Seriously, someone give the casting directions a pay rise.

From there we jump inside Qo’nos in one of the best special effects shots of the season.  It’s beautiful, and Discovery looks magnificent!  As you know, I’ve been in love with this ship and its design since before we saw the finalised model, thanks to being a fan of Ralph McQuarrie’s original NCC-1701 refit sketches for Star Trek: Phase II and Star Trek: The Motion Picture.  Seeing Discovery inside one of the Qo’nos caverns was pretty damn special and it gave us a really good look at this graceful, gorgeous ship.

The Discovery Inside Qo'nos

After that breathtaking moment we visit with Georgiou’s team as they beam into the Orion sector on Qo’nos.  FYI, the Klingons allow the Orions to have space (an ’embassy’) on their world, inhabiting an area that was once a shrine to a Klingon deity prior to Kahless’s rise to power.  Why?  Well, it actually makes sense.  Every country (more or less) has embassies, so too would most, if not all, worlds in space that had some sort of a relation with other planets.  If anyone was going to take that offered space and turn into a bizarre, sexy, over the top mess, it would be the Orions.  Or the Ferengi!

Sadly, this was more stuff we didn’t need.

I don’t know if I just have my cranky pants on or what, but really, was any of this necessary?  Couldn’t we have spent the time better?

We play around in Orion town for a good chunk of what’s left of the episode, watching Ash gamble with Klingons (freaking Michael out in the process), Georgiou getting her sexy on in a bisexual romp that plays into the “all bisexuals are evil” trope we’ve seen in way too many movies and television series, and Tilly getting stoned.

Disco S1E15 Georgiou Teaches the Orions a Thing or Two


All the while, Michael looks serious and none too happy with what’s going on.  We do get some character development for Michael, though, as we learn what happened to her parents in an unpleasant and disturbing disclosure to Ash that helps us (and him) understand why she is struggling with what has happened to (been revealed about) him.

It’s a moving scene, but one that’s a little out of place.  I wish we’d learned these facts earlier, perhaps in the second episode of the Mirror arc.  We would have felt the impact of Ash’s betrayal more if that had been the case.

Eventually, we learn what we already knew was true.  The probe is a bomb and Georgiou is super evil (SURPRISE!) and is out to blow Qo’nos into tiny little pieces.  All with the blessing of Starfleet.

This leads to a face off between Michael and Admiral Cornwell that produces one of the best scenes in the entire episode.  The face off almost turns into another mutiny, led by Michael, because… “book end.”  I was okay with that but wonder if we needed it?  Book ends are nice, but a little uncomfortable when you’re beaten over the head with them!

The best thing about the confrontation is that it provides a nice moment for the crew of Discovery, taking what we saw last episode and building on it, and showing just how close this team has gotten, and how much of a family they have become.

I think it’s my favourite scene in the episode and it’s played beautifully by everyone.  It makes Cornwell look weak and frightened, which isn’t great, and it makes Starfleet and the Federation look completely inept, which is really disappointing, but Jayne Brook plays it perfectly and sells it with genuine emotion, adding in enough bluster and eventual shame and regret to show us that no one is happy with the steps Starfleet has taken.  Sadly, it’s not enough to explain why this decision was agreed to in the first place, but at least they tried.  I guess.

After that strong scene we jump back to Georgiou twirling her moustache as she and Michael face off over the probe that’s not a probe, and was always a bomb.

Michael wins.  L’Rell beams down.  L’Rell gets the bomb.  L’Rell gets convinced to go bring the Klingon High Council to it’s knees under her rule.  Ash decides to stay with L’Rell.  The Klingons call off their fleet as it’s within striking distance of Earth.  We all live happily ever after as the Discovery heads home.

And Georgiou?  She’s let go.  Set free by Starfleet to wreak havoc in the Prime Universe.  Which is ridiculous.  But, it means she’ll be in season two and I do love Michelle Yeoh, so I can’t really complain too much about that moment.

As we cruise toward the end of the episode, we go to Earth and visit with Amanda and Sarek in Paris.  Which I appreciated.  Mia Kirshner does the role of Amanda proud and is just perfect as the strong human woman who exists in both Michael and Spock’s lives to remind them that though being Vulcan is something to be proud of, so too is being human.

Will You Take My Hand - Amanda, Michael and Sarek

After Michael’s oh-too-brief but beautiful moment with her mother, Sarek steps in to come clean about his role in helping Starfleet make the universe’s stupidest decision.  He’s not just there, though, to show that wise-older-Vulcan’s are fallible too, he’s there for another reason.  He tells Michael her record has been expunged and she has been reinstated as a Commander.

From there we go inside, to Michael and the Discovery crew getting medals for their part in the war.  Which is weird.  Because they were barely in it.  They obtained vital intel, this is true, but then were abducted and taken to an alternate universe to return nine-months later to a devastated Federation.  Their intel didn’t end up doing much, because the Klingons had advanced quite a way into Federation space… and yet they got medals.  They deserve them, because they did end the war thanks to Philippa and her probe-come-bomb, but somehow it felt… unearned?

Will You Take My Hand - Michael Gives A Speech

Throughout the awards ceremony Michael is giving a speech, which, it seems, has actually been going on since the beginning of the episode in snatches that you would have been forgiven for thinking were log entry voiceovers.  The scenes of her giving this speech to the Admiralty are inter cut with the medal presentations and it’s all a little disjointed and questionably put together.  I found it confusing and jarring the first time I saw it, and annoying the second.

I will admit, though, that I felt a tear come to my eye as Michael was embraced back into the arms of Starfleet.  Sonequa Martin-Green conveys so much emotion in those last moments in Paris that you can’t help but be swept away in her moment.  Far out that woman is a great actor!

Now we come to the end of the episode, and the season.

It’s a doozy.

The very last scenes reveal one of the biggest twists (another freaking twist for the season), if not the biggest twist for any Star Trek series.

After Paul talks about why they’re warping to Vulcan instead of jumping, Sarek joins them on the bridge as they clear the Sol system.  There’s some nice banter, everything feels a little weird though – but that’s probably because there’s more light on this bridge than ever before (thank you Mirror-Lorca for all the shadowy stuff), when Lieutenant Bryce announces he’s receiving a distress signal.

Will You Take My Hand - NCC1...

The call is coming from another Federation starship, but Bryce is having some trouble getting a clear signal.  As the communications officer deciphers the vessel’s call sign we see it start to form on one of his displays: N… C… C… 1… 7…

The Discovery drops out of warp, Saru sends a message and we are suddenly told the hail is from Captain Pike.  Captain Christopher Pike.

Disco S1E15 Enterprise Arrives

Michael works it out first and has a knowing look with Sarek as she says… “It’s the USS Enterprise.

Disco S1E15 Enterprise NCC-1701 Approaches

And we see that iconic ship appear.

She’s beautiful.  But, she’s not quite the ship we’re used to.

Disco S1E15 Enterprise and Discovery Meet

As the Enterprise and Discovery come nose to nose, we cut to black.

That moment brought a smile to my face!  If I’m to be completely honest, that, not Michael’s standoff with Cornwell, is my favourite moment of the episode.

Then, to drive the impact home, the closing title sequence features a beautiful and brilliantly faithful rendition of Alexander Courage’s original Star Trek theme.

The episode ended on a high, but it took a really disappointing road getting there.

When we compare this season of Star Trek: Discovery with any other first season of a Trek show, there is no doubt this is the strongest launch out of the gate any previous series has ever had.

Somewhere, though, it went wrong.

Star Trek: Discovery, up until episode three of the four episode long Mirror arc, was building beautifully and seemed to sail by on a clear path toward a massive reckoning and inevitable redemption that would culminate in a devastating clash between the Federation and the Klingon empire.

Only it didn’t.  They spent one or two episodes too many in the Mirror Universe, and then short changed us on the Klingons and the war.

We were promised we would get a deeper insight into the Klingons.  It didn’t happen.

We were told this season was a war-story arc… and it was, we just didn’t get to see more than a few flashes of the war.

We were told so much, and they didn’t deliver on about half of it.

I think what pissed me off the most though, was watching After Trek and seeing the writers so pleased with themselves, and watching Matt Mira avoid any sort of conversation around “so, what happened guys?  Where was the war?”

Is “Will You Take My Hand?” a terrible episode?  Probably not.  Is it the weakest and worst of the season?  You bet.  Is it a wasted opportunity?  Criminally so and it casts a bit of a shadow over the entire season.

All I can do is hope the writers are reading everyone’s reviews.  I’ve read a few, and some people love the episode, but quite a few are just as disappointed and disheartened as I am.

Will I be tuning in for season two?  HELL YES.  As much as I have complained about this episode, the thing I am taking away from this season is how amazing it was.  Most of the time.  It has delivered characters I care about.  Some of the writing has been Emmy level worthy.  The effects have been staggering.  The direction has been beautiful.  The music has been moving.  There’s so much to love about Star Trek: Discovery.  I won’t let “Will You Take My Hand?” ruin the season for me, but I also won’t say “yay!  It was great!” when it wasn’t, just because I love Star Trek and am so happy to have it back.

When I push away my frustrations over this episode, I can’t help but think that two average episodes out of 15 is pretty great.

I should probably talk about the 430 crew strong starship in the room before I go, hey?  What do I think of the redesign?

I like it a lot.  Its a pretty faithful update. It’s a mix of the original design and the refit model from Star Trek: The Motion Picture.  But, despite liking it, I don’t think the changes they made were necessary.  The USS Enterprise is THE most iconic starship in the world, and it is definitely the most iconic starship in science fiction.  No matter what, they had to render the new ship in the Star Trek: Discovery lighting design and colour scheme, and with the level of detail we now expect, but they could have done that without changing the original design as much as they did.

USS Enterprise NCC-1701 Fan Render

To prove that, check out the above incredible render by Carlos Daniel, and visit that same render, in flight, on his Vimeo page here.  Thanks to TrekMovie for sharing this with Trek fandom.

Apart from the spinny bits on the nacelle in the fan version, you have to admit everything else looks beautiful and shows that the original model, with maybe a little more texturing and some spotlight effects like we see on other ships in the show, would work beautifully with the design aesthetic of Star Trek: Discovery.

As I said, I like the new version, but it does make me think, once again, that CBS is thinking of rebooting everything and only leaving Star Trek: Enterprise intact.  If that’s so, I’m not against that – just do it respectfully.  With a little more respect than the creatives behind Star Trek: Discovery have shown.  They’ve been pretty good, but they have taken one or three liberties that they didn’t need to, and they’ve walked a very fine line that they might want to pull back from a bit come season two.

1. It would appear the crew of Christopher Pike’s USS Enterprise will play a role, however large or small, in the next season.

How long will the Enterprise stay around?  I’m giving it four episodes.

2. Georgiou?  She’ll resurface for the mid-season finale.

3. The new Captain?  I have no idea.  I heard someone suggest it might be Number One from “The Cage.”  YES.  PLEASE.  MAKE IT SO!

The Crew of the USS Discovery Season 1


What a roller coaster of a season.  I’ve loved more of the episodes than I’ve disliked, and as I said above there are only two episodes I’m not thoroughly happy with – and one of them I actually enjoyed, except for the unintended (I believe) sexist undertone (“Magic to Make The Sanest Man Go Mad”).

I’ve fallen in love with this crew and can’t wait for season two, but I hope it’s a little tighter and does what it tells us it will do.

I admit feel a little cheated over the Klingon war, and a little disappointed over the rushed ended.  The Klingons are not my favourite Star Trek species, but I was looking forward to an in-depth look at them, juxtaposed with a nascent and growing UFP.

I really enjoyed most of the Mirror Universe arc, but I would have preferred it not happen at all if it had meant seeing a moving story about the horrors of war.  I don’t enjoy war movies, but I am a fan of commentaries on war and with us facing an uncertain future thanks to tensions between the USA, China, Russia and North Korea, now is the right time for those types of stories.

Maybe next year.

As we hear news on Star Trek: Discovery, we’ll update you here.

Until then, and always, Live Long and Prosper.

LCARS Interface

Episode 6 Recap and Review, and an Announcement from CBS

Star Trek Discovery Recap and Review Banner 27102017

Before we jump into everything, CBS made an important announcement earlier in the week: Star Trek: Discovery has been renewed for a second season!

Congratulations to everyone involved.  So much love, time, care and attention to detail has gone into the show and this is a fitting reward for all of that exceptional effort.  As a fan, I am over the moon happy!

Thank you CBS.

Okay.  Let’s dive into this weeks episode.

Lethe was the mystical underworld river of oblivion, and the Greek Spirit of forgetfulness and oblivion, after which the river was named.

The shades of the dead used to drink from her waters to forget their mortal lives.

Star Trek: Discovery, episode six, “Lethe”, draws from that inspiration as it plays with the idea of memory and the things we might want to forget.

This was another episode that went by in a flash.  It’s also another episode that will challenge those Trekkers among us who choose to stick rigidly to perceived canon.

I say perceived, because canon doesn’t mean “this is it, and this is all there can be,” it means “this is what we know for now.”  In Star Trek, canon is what we see on screen.

Personally, I enjoy having my own perceptions of canon expanded and in most cases Star Trek: Discovery treads just this side of going too far.  Where they have crossed the line, most of the time they’ve had to.  What worked in 1966 will not work in 2017.  Choices had to be made, and while some of those choices are a bit mystifying right now we’ve been told they’ll make sense.  Eventually.  Of course, having said that, there are some things we’ll just have to deal with – the most noticeable being the design aesthetic of the 21st Century vs the design aesthetic of an era where colour TV was brand new, and the world had never heard of things like the internet, cloud computing, and 3D printing.

After watching “Lethe”, I found myself both excited by the things I had learned in the episode, and I found myself thinking back over an article I wrote a few months back where I wondered if CBS was purposefully rebooting the entire television franchise, just like Paramount rebooted the movies.

Back when Star Trek: Discovery was still teasing us with a non-committal release date, I began thinking “is this a reboot of everything, using Star Trek: Enterprise as the jumping off point?

I’m pretty sure that’s not an original thought, by the way.

Now and again, watching this new iteration of Star Trek, I wonder if that is indeed what is happening.  Back when I first wrote about that idea, I encouraged the new creative team behind Star Trek to take the 15 best episodes of each season of the existing Treks (post Star Trek: Discovery) and redo them.  That’s sacrilege to a lot of Trekkers, I know, but I keep thinking of how deeply Star Trek both changed and defined my life, and keep hoping that it will do the same for children in this and following generations.  I grew up with TNG and its impact on my life and the way I live it is still significant today.

I also keep worrying that the earlier versions of Star Trek will become niche memories for a faithful few.  When we look back at the older iterations of Trek we see moments of sexism and we see a visual style that is… kind of flat and boring.  Even TNG and more recent Trek’s fail to live up to the dynamic and visual style of today’s event television.  Using Star Trek: Enterprise as a jumping off point, and then rebooting the entire franchise from there, isn’t a terrible idea if the reboot is faithful to the original.  So… not a Battlestar Galactica reboot.  Not even a J.J. Abrams Kelvin-timeline reboot.  An update of the original where certain things can be ‘tweaked’, like the sexism, like the ship’s computer in TOS which has already been surpassed by Siri, and like many of the props and effects that just don’t hold up today.  As much as many of us probably don’t like admitting it, Star Trek: Discovery is a more faithful imagining of the future than we were capable of in the 1960s.  Even the 1980s.

What made me think back over those things?  The Holodeck (?) battle simulation Ash and Lorca went through, and the simple realism of the set of the Discovery and the shows props and visuals.  We see things in this episode that are going to give the more strict among us reason to complain, but they make sense when held up against the reality and wider audience expectations of today.

Sometimes I think these changes come down to one question: do we want Star Trek to live long and prosper?

But, enough of my musing (heretical ramblings?).  Let’s get into the recap and review.

Sarek Looks Across Vulcan - Lethe

The Facts
Episode Number: 106
Episode Title: “Lethe”
Written By: Ted Sullivan and Trek alumni Joe Menosky
Directed By: Doug Aarniokoski

Sarek to his assistant
: “In times of crisis, ignorance can be beneficial.

Tilly to Michael: “It’s been my experience, that what I lack in athletic ability I more than make up for in intelligence and personality.  We may want to focus on those attributes.
Michael to Tilly: “Everyone applying to the command training program will be smart.  Personality doesn’t count.
Tilly, in response: “That’s just something people with no personality say… wait!  Which in… which in no way means you… ah… you, you absolutely have a personality!

Tilly to the computer: “Computer, green juice.  Extra green.

Interesting Bits and Pieces
In the second scene of the episode, Michael is trying to help Tilly achieve her dream of one day becoming a captain.  In that scene, she name drops the Constitution Class and the USS Enterprise, recommending that Tilly aim to get on a ship like the Enterprise to help with her career aspirations.

In this same scene, both women are wearing an awesome little t-shirt with one word printed on it: Disco.  Disco has long been an internal production nickname for the show.

According to After Trek, the producers had no idea the t-shirts were going to appear!  Now, they’re canon, and you can bet you’ll be able to buy them some time soon.  That is, if you can’t already!  I admit, I haven’t done that search on the official website, eBay or Amazon yet.

In this episode, we also learn that the food synthesiser likes to comment on the nutritional quality of your order!  I like that… though I could see me telling the computer to shut up after a while!  I can’t stand my fridge beeping at me when I’ve had the door open for too long.  If my fridge started talking to me I’d probably unplug it.

We also learn, thanks to Admiral Cornwell, that the Discovery is the most advanced starship in the fleet.

The Recap and Review
After “last time on Star Trek: Discovery,” the episode jumps into a scene on Vulcan, which is beautiful.

The visuals are evocative of past glimpses of the planet, while bringing something new.  There is no doubting it’s Vulcan you’re visiting.  We find Sarek is looking out across a dessert locked, red tinged city scape as a ship hovers into view.

Sarek and an assistant board the vessel and take off across the surface of the planet, into space.

The ship is a new design but looks Vulcan, and, like Starfleet vessels, has an excellent heads up display that I really like.

We don’t know where Sarek and his companion are going.

That scene transitions beautifully into a shot of the Discovery sailing through the void, and then moves seamlessly to an interior shot of Michael and Tilly jogging along one of the spokes that connects the two halves of the saucer section of the Discovery.

Michael is helping Tilly develop some strategies and habits that will benefit her in her pursuit of command.

According to After Trek, this scene took eight hours to shoot because the corridors were only long enough to permit ten seconds of dialogue as the actors ran the full length.  So, the slight exhaustion you see on Sylvia Tilly’s face might actually be more than good acting.

The interchange between both characters is wonderful.  These two actors play off each other really well, and the chemistry is so easy to see on the screen.  While the dialogue is excellent, you can’t fake chemistry.  I often find myself silently congratulating everyone involved in the casting process.

As Tilly responds to Michael’s mentorship, dashing on ahead of the show’s leading lady, we cut to a scene of Lorca and Ash Tyler zapping Klingons.

Lorca, being Lorca, has a deep and meaningful (D&M) with Tyler as they run around in armour shooting stuff.  Seriously, this ship needs Deanna Troi.  If these two men ooze out any more testosterone and repressed rage the whole ship will drown in it.

In their macho-D&M session, we learn that Ash is from Seattle and has lost both parents.  He had a challenging relationship with his father, which might hint at Lorca being a bit of a surrogate for him – just like he seems to be for Michael.

Lorca and Ash - Lethe

In an interesting exchange where Ash lies to Lorca to help his captain save a bit of face we learn that Lorca really does want to be surrounded by the best.  And probably needs a hobby like knitting or yoga to avoid going absolutely batshit crazy.  This guy is wound so tight he’s going to snap at some point and Michael is going to have to trot out the mutiny card again.  Lorca chews Ash out and tells him he wants his Chief of Security to shoot better than he does.  Chief of Security?  Ash, DO NOT take that job!  The last one got mangled by an unhappy tardigrade!!

This exchange surprises Ash, who asks Lorca if he’s giving him a job?  In a potentially telling moment (if you go by the Ash is Voq theory), Lorca says: “Well, I figure I’ve seen you fly, shoot… fight like a Klingon…”  Fight light a Klingon.  Way to screw with our heads, Star Trek: Discovery writing team.

Ash brushes that off, saying that he learned a thing or two from the Klingons beating on him for seven months.

Lorca then affirms Ash’s appointment.

We jump back to Sarek and his assistant, who shoots himself up with a funky little needle that starts tracing a burning pattern up his arm.

Sarek quickly realises that his assistant knows just what it is he’s planning to do and isn’t happy about it.

The assistant turns out to be a fanatic – a “logic extremist” who believes that humans are inferior.

It’s a nice tip of the hat to Star Trek: Enterprise and the less than pro-human sentiment often expressed by the Vulcans of that era, and it’s a nice nod to what we’re going through as a world today with extremists threatening our way of life, and the pro-nationalist views of some.

The assistant’s mission?  To draw attention to Vulcan purity, and to encourage Vulcan as a world to withdraw from the “…failed experiment known as the Federation.”  With that, he blows himself up.  Sarek erects a forcefield between the two men just in time, but that doesn’t stop the explosion from sending Sarek’s shuttle spinning out of control, and it doesn’t stop Sarek from being wounded.

We cut to the credit sequence.  Which, I have to say, is really growing on me.

And then we return to the Discovery where Tilly is ordering a green juice.  That’s extra green.

She and Michael order breakfast, with Michael over ruling Tilly’s choice.  The ships computer backs Michael up, reading out the nutritional value of burritos.

Ash Tyler walks in, and the girls have a bit of a gossip about how he kicked Klingon ass.  Six asses, to be exact.  It’s an interesting exchange because Michael makes the same comment many of us have been making since the last episode… Klingons are tough.  How could one human over power so many single handedly?  This is such a throw away comment in the context of the scene that you just know it means something.

Tilly also observes that Lorca wants to adopt Ash.  Michael challenges that, but Tilly reminds her that Lorca did the same to her.

Michael Tilly and Ash

Tilly, proving she has no filter, then sits down at Ash’s table and blurts out “Scuttlebut is that you took out six Klingon warriors in hand to hand combat.

Ash tells her not to believe everything she hears, and then asks Michael to sit.  We have an exchange between Ash and Michael that is really nice as he refuses to judge her on her past actions, and prefers instead to make up his mind based on what he sees.  That impresses Michael and makes her look at this new crew member in a different light.

Then, Michael collapses in pain!

In a katra-contact moment, Michael is plunged into one of Sarek’s memories.

We’re on Vulcan watching Vulcan’s wander serenely through a pristine plaza.  It’s beautiful, and full of familiar little touches, including examples of the Vulcan alphabet.  We zero in on a family gathering and finally meet Amanda, played beautifully by Mia Kirshner.  She’s arguing with Sarek over what appears to be Michael’s rejection from the Vulcan Expeditionary Group.  A young Michael watches on.  As does the current Michael, observing the memory as an outsider.

Mia Kirshner as Amanda Grayson

Sarek becomes aware of the older Michael, and challenges her, forcing her out of the memory.

They appear in a neutral mental space, where Sarek tells her that ever since the bombing of the learning centre his Katra has been with her.

She wakes up in Sickbay before we get to go any deeper into that little addition to canon.

Doctor Culber is trying to work out what is wrong as Lorca watches on.  Michael opens her eyes.

She tells them Sarek is in trouble.  Lorca challenges her, and she reveals that she shares part of Sarek’s katra.  Lorca wants to know more, so she reminds him that after her parents were killed at a Vulcan outpost that was attacked by the Klingons, she was raised by Vulcans to be Vulcan.  She says that Sarek hoped she could serve as a bridge to show other Vulcan’s the potential in humanity.

She then reveals something new.  A group of logic extremists, who did not want humans in their culture, attempted to kill her a few years later, while she was at the Vulcan Learning Academy.  It was then, to save her life, that Sarek shared his katra with her.

She was dead for three minutes.  Sarek’s katra had healing powers and his life force saved her life.  She tells them it is a rare procedure, and frowned upon.  It’s this gift that enables a form of long term telepathy between both Sarek and Michael.

She tells Lorca that Sarek is in danger and asks him to rescue her adopted father.

Lorca checks the facts with Starfleet, and they confirm Michael’s claims.  Sarek was on a diplomatic mission to try and stop the war.

Lorca says he’ll rescue Sarek, but Starfleet forbids it.  Lorca, being Lorca, ignores them.

They jump to the nebula that was the last known location of Sarek’s shuttle.  Saru tells them that they can’t scan for the shuttle because of all of the interference in the nebula and that it will take months to search it because of its size.

Lorca and Michael visit Stamets to see if he can help by creating a device that will enhance Michael’s connection to Sarek.

Stamets says “yes” – and it is clear we have a brand new Stamets.  His interaction with the spore-drive has really changed him.  He’s more relaxed, almost euphoric.

After some discussion, he says he can create something for Burnham and gets to work.

We also learn he has a bit of an implant that enables him to safely (?) engage with the drive.

Lorca tells Burnham to get a team ready to help her with locating Sarek.

Lorca and Ash on Shuttle - Lethe

Michael asks Lorca to assign Tilly to help her, because she’s a genius, and, in a telling moment, because Michael needs her emotional support.

Daw… friendship.  I LOVE IT!

Lorca agrees, and then assigns Ash Tyler to help.

As Tilly, Ash and Michael load up the shuttle and get it ready to enter the nebula, Lorca visits Ash and orders Ash to bring Michael back in one piece… or to not come back at all.

Hmmm… what does Lorca want from Michael?  She’s brilliant.  She’s extraordinary in many ways, but what are Lorca’s plans for her?

We leave our intrepid rescuers for a moment to cut to Lorca examining a star chart as Admiral Katrina Cornwell warps in for a visit.  She boards the Discovery and proceeds to rip Lorca a new one for disobeying orders.

She’s also not happy that one of his crew experimented with eugenics.

Behind all of this anger from Cornwell, we learn, is genuine concern for an old friend.  Lorca is not the Lorca Cornwell remembers.

We leave them in that moment and jump to the shuttle where Michael is preparing to send a katra ‘jolt’ to Sarek to wake him up so that he’ll activate his ships transponder so that the Discovery can find him.

In a nice character moment, Michael is nervous and anxious.  She shares her feelings with Tilly and Ash and tells them how affected she is by the memory she was dragged into in her initial psychic contact with Sarek.  She believes he is reliving that memory in his dying moments because she is his greatest disappointment.

As she goes under, she tells them not to pull her out of the katra connection, no matter what happens.

And… we’re back in the Vulcan plaza, in the same memory.

Sarek - Lethe

Young Michael is talking to Amanda, who gives her a gift – an old fashioned copy of Alice in Wonderland.  Going back to “Context is for Kings”, it’s obvious Amanda had as much of an impact on Michael as Sarek did.

Sarek intrudes and tells them that Michael’s application to the Expeditionary Group was rejected.

Older Michael interjects, and Sarek breaks from the memory to do some kick-ass Vulcan martial arts on Michael.

Back in the shuttle, Michael is showing the effects of being psychically beaten up.

Ash orders Tilly to wake Michael, and as she comes to with a gasp we jump to Discovery and a dinner between Lorca and Cornwell.

They’re reminiscing.

Lorca and Cornwell - Lethe

She tells him she’s worried about him.

He justifies his behaviours using the excuse of war.  She’s not going to be put off and tells him he’s unfairly pushing his crew.

Eventually, she tells him that he’s changed since the destruction of the Buran.

He says he’s passed every test and is fine.  She’s smarter than that and suggests that maybe he’s suffering from PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder).  So… he seduces her, because he’s either got PTSD or there’s something else going on.

She falls for it.  Maybe?  I’m not sure if Katrina lets it happen in a calculated attempt to further test Lorca, or lets him seduce her because she still carries a flame for this complicated man, but she takes off her badge and smiles at him…

And we’re back on the shuttle.

Michael is deeply affected by the memory she keeps seeing.

Ash gives Michael a reality check, and says that maybe the memory isn’t about her failure – but Sareks?

Michael dives back into the katra-connection.

We’re back in the same memory and Michael has had enough.  She challenges Sarek on the memory-scape, asking him what he’s hiding.  He attacks her and she holds her own.  She asks him what he doesn’t want her to see, and begs him to let her in.

He does.

He also affirms what Ash said.  He’s not fixated on Michael’s failure.  He’s focused on his own.

We learn that Michael was accepted into the Vulcan Expeditionary Group, but that the Vulcan’s were concerned.  Were Spock to apply and be accepted, there would be two non-Vulcans in what had once been a Vulcan only institution – one human raised to be a Vulcan, whom Sarek says he has crafted into a being of exquisite logic, and one half-human, half-Vulcan who is still (it seems) at school.

The Vulcan elder tells Sarek that what he has done is extraordinary, and that he applauds Sarek’s efforts to integrate humans into Vulcan culture, but that his attempts need to be titrated.

Sarek has to choose between Michael and Spock.

Michael learns that Sarek chose Spock.  This adds a beautiful, extra layer to the historic distance between Sarek and Spock.  It always seemed petty that Sarek was so ‘pissed’ with his son for choosing Starfleet, this adds another welcome dimension and gives that history more impact.

Michael tells Sarek that her rejection from the Vulcan Expeditionary Group hurt her deeply.

Sarek says he didn’t realise the impact then, but does now.  He apologises, as only a Vulcan can: “I failed you, Michael Burnham.”

As he collapses on the memory-scape, he admits his shame.

Michael asks him to show her how to save him, like he saved her.  He helps her initiate a mind-meld and she wakes Sarek up.  He activates the transponder.

We cut to Lorca and Cornwell in bed.  She traces the scars on his back, which wakes him up.  Instead of snuggle time, he grabs a phaser from under his bed and rolls on top of her holding it to her face.

She loses her shit… and rightfully so.

She tells him he lied on his psyche evaluation and that his behaviour is pathological.  She finishes with the worst thing she could say: “I can’t leave Starfleets most powerful weapon in the hands of a broken man.

This illicits a genuine response from Lorca as he begs to keep his ship.  He admits his lie, admits that he needs help.  She tells him that she hates that she can’t tell if this is the real Lorca or not, and leaves.

Saru interrupts to tell Lorca that the crew are back from their mission.  Sarek is going to be alright, but he can’t finish his mission of peace.  Lorca says that Cornwell can.

Burnham thanks Lorca and in return he gives her a real assignment.  On the bridge.  She’s now the science specialist.

As Lorca leaves, she goes to visit Sarek.  He initially tries to dodge her question about what he remembers of the rescue, but she’s not having any of it.  Michael asks him to help her understand why he did what he did, so that they can come closer rather than be pushed further apart, because that’s what families do.  He says that technically they’re not related, and she tells him he can do better than that, but she won’t push him.  She tells him “We’ll have this conversation one day… father,” and leaves Sarek, looking a little lost, perhaps even a little shamed, in Sickbay.

Admiral Cornwell takes up the challenge of completing Sareks mission.  Lorca is waiting for her in the shuttlebay as she gets ready to leave.  She tells him that she doesn’t want to ruin his career, but adds that when she returns they will talk about how he steps down.  There’s compassion in her voice and it’s clear she believes her decision to be the right one – for Lorca, for the Discovery and her crew, and for Starfleet.

Lorca can’t find a response, and instead wishes her luck in her negotiations.

Just a side note, I love the new shuttlebay.  It’s magnificent.  It looks real, and it looks used.  It looks like it belongs on a ship like Discovery that has been busy both with a mission of science and exploration (previously), and now a mission of defence. The shuttle bays on the original Enterprise and Enterprise-D always bugged me because they looked… plastic and totally unused.  Even with transporters, those ships would have been busy with freight transfer and various visitors but they just looked lifeless.

We change scenes at this point to an interaction between Tilly and Michael.  Tilly is running through the corridors again.  Michael tells her, “I gave you bad advice.  There are a million ways to get to the captain’s chair.  Find your own.”  Tilly responds with, “I have,” and keeps running.

We follow Michael to the mess hall where she sits down with Ash Tyler.  Michael, obviously affected by her chats with both Sarek and Tilly, is in a reflective space.  She opens up to Ash, and we see a woman who is slowly coming to terms with the complicated relationship she has with her adopted father, and maybe even the internal conflict she feels as a human who has spent a great deal of her life trying too hard to be a Vulcan rather than a balanced amalgam of both.

To close the scene, Michael introduces herself to Ash, who is a bit confused at first because they know each other, but then gets it.  Michael has had an epiphany, or perhaps even a little bit of a rebirth and with a smile he takes her extended hand.

We leave this budding friendship? romance? to visit with Admiral Cornwell.  Let’s just say things go bad.  Her guards are killed.  The meeting hosts are killed.  Kol pops up as a hologram and Cornwell is taken prisoner.

In the last scene, Saru reports to Lorca, telling him Cornwell has been captured.  Prick-Lorca is in full swing as Saru tells Lorca they can start to calculate a jump to rescue her and Lorca says no.  Saru is taken aback.  Lorca rationalises his sudden “by the book” caution beautifully.

He orders Saru to notify Starfleet Command and to seek guidance.  Saru is surprised, but no doubt relieved by this change in his captain.  Saru is awesome, but he’s not a great first officer.

As he leaves to follow orders, Lorca closes the door of his quarters and the episode ends with him staring out the window as we focus on his reflection.

Is his reflection smiling?

Is this another hint at the upcoming Mirror-Universe episode?

I just know we’re going to have to wait a while and see.

USS Discovery in Flight

I really enjoyed this episode on so many levels.  I love the additional context to Sarek’s disappointment with Spock’s decision to go into Starfleet, as I mentioned earlier in the recap, and I’m intrigued by where the whole cloaking technology thing is going with the Klingons.

Historically, according to canon, the Klingons obtained their cloaking technology from the Romulans.  So… did T’Kuvmar negotiate that and then Kol meter it out through the Empire as he demanded loyalty from the various Houses?

Quite a few questions were raised in this episode.  Is the need for eugenic experimentation on humans what kills the spore-drive?  Does that mean we’re going to lose Stamets?

Is Ash Voq?  I keep trying to determine from Shazad Latif’s performance if he is, but can’t yet.

One the things I like most about this series, is the growth we’re starting to see in the characters.  They’re not fully realised.  They’re “becoming.”  We’re really seeing it in Michael’s character – and it’s a beautiful thing and very measured.  The writers have paced it beautifully, certainly a lot better than Star Trek: Voyager‘s writing team paced the integration of the Maquis and Tom Paris back into Starfleet.

Lorca’s character also continues to grow (or perhaps, more appropriately, be revealed), and it is evident he is a very damaged human being.  Did he recommend Admiral Katrina Cornwell go to the Klingons because he was hoping she’d be captured or killed?  Does winning the war mean that much to him?

We haven’t seen much of Saru recently, which is a little disappointing, but I get it.  The writers needed to set up Ash Tyler.  This will change, I believe, with Michael now on the bridge.

I like the addition to canon of the katra-communication.  There’s a parallel here to the mycelial network.  If there’s a bunch of spores spread throughout the universe that can be used as a source of navigation, why couldn’t a psychic ability have that kind of range?  I’m just not sure what the writers are getting it?  There’s a definite but very subtle spiritual aspect to this show, that hints at the interconnection of life.  Starfleet represents that and always has.  We’re all ‘star stuff’ and our commonalities are more interesting and meaningful than our differences, and so we should come together and celebrate that infinite diversity in its infinite combinations.

Though the Vulcan’s are best known for that philosophy of diversity, it’s interesting to see them still struggling with Surak’s teachings.  It is a nice echo from Star Trek: Enterprise, and I loved seeing Sarek be the main proponent of that concept with his attempts to unite the Vulcan people and humanity.  He will, of course, continue to do that kind of work throughout the history of Star Trek as he seeks to unite other disparate peoples.  Spock, of course, will eventually follow in his father’s footsteps.

All of this stuff also gives merit to Sybok.  Imagine being the oldest child growing up in such a mixed household?  You have a human step-mother, a human adopted sister and a half-human younger brother.  You can imagine Sybok sitting back and observing the strengths in both as his father seeks to bring two important worlds together.  All of this actually helps make sense of Sybok, but it also paints Sarek, always one of my favourite characters, as a vital part of the Federation.

By the time we really get to know Sarek, in the movie-era and in TNG, he’s an elder statesman who is held in high regard by everyone.  Star Trek: Discovery is helping us see why and how – despite his stubborn streak!

It’s just one opinion, but my opinion is that Star Trek: Discovery gives more to Star Trek than some of the other spin-off series.  It’s giving the entire collection of series’ and films a level of depth that I really appreciate.

Last but not least, there is not one bad performance.  Again.  Particular praise needs to be heaped on Sonequa Martin-Green, Jason Isaacs and James Frain.

How lucky are we to have such amazing actors bringing these characters to life?


Five Starfleet Deltas
Five out five Starfleet Deltas.  This was another exceptional outing.

Star Trek: Discovery airs in the United States on CBS All Access with new episodes available Sundays at 8:30pm ET.  In Canada, the show airs on the Space Channel at 8:00pm ET.  Outside the USA and Canada, Star Trek: Discovery airs on Netflix with new episodes dropping in the UK at 8:00am BST on Mondays, and in Australia at 6:00pm AEDT, also on Mondays.  We only have three more episodes until the mid-season break, so make sure you tune in.

Live long, and prosper.  See you next episode for “Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad.”

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Star Trek: Discovery Update

Star Trek Discovery Update Banner

A surprising amount of information has dropped recently about Star Trek: Discovery, with more news due to hit in October – though there has been a suggestion we could learn a tiny bit more in early September.

For international viewers, like myself, we recently learned that Netflix has secured the international airing rights for the series – which has upset our American friends, and understandably so, but as someone who has spent his entire Star Trek loving life having to wait months for episodes, it’s nice to not be facing that particular barrier with this incarnation of my favourite series.

As well as word on how the rest of the world will be able to watch the new series, the following exciting teasers were delivered by the man himself, Bryan Fuller:

  • The new lead character won’t be the Captain, it will be the First Officer of the Discovery.  The First Officer, called simply “Number One” (in fine Star Trek tradition) for now, will get a name eventually;
  • Number One will be female and she will hold the rank of Lieutenant Commander;
  • The show is definitely in the Prime timeline, and will be set ten years before James T. Kirk takes command of the Enterprise;
  • The ship we saw in the preview shown a few weeks ago is still being tweaked and that design is not the final design;
  • The show will ‘bounce off’ of an event that was spoken about in the original series, but never explored.  That event isn’t the Kobyashi Maru, nor is is the Battle of Axanar or the Earth-Romulan War… guesses anyone?
  • There will be robots and more aliens that we’ve ever seen before… whether those aliens and robots are on the ship or just appearing throughout the series we don’t know right now;
  • The first season will have a 13 episode order, with Bryan’s preference for following seasons to be 10 episodes in length;
  • Section 31 might make an appearance;
  • Each episode will run about 48 minutes – slightly longer than the 44 minutes most modern versions of Star Trek have run;
  • There will be an openly gay character;
  • Traditional aliens from the original series will get a bit of a revamp;
  • The uniforms will be different to those seen in “The Cage”, but no word on how similar they will be to the uniforms worn by Kirk and crew in the Original Series;
  • The music is still being figured out with a good chance some of it will be reminiscent of the Original Series scores.

A really interesting theory from Joseph Baxter, a writer for SciFi news site Blastr, had me really excited recently – because I love it, and I so want it to be true!  Okay, I’m still excited about it!

He theorises we might already know the lead character.  He wonders, in a very well reasoned argument, if this mysterious Lieutenant Commander is none other than Majel Barrett Roddenberry’s character from “The Cage”, known only to us fans as Number One.

That would be AWESOME!

Despite only appearing in “The Cage” and the re-edited version of that episode called “The Menagerie” parts one and two, Number One has a huge fan following.  That character sparked something in fans that has not faded in 50 years.

Bryan has said that this Number One is an homage to the original character created by Gene and his wife, but he hasn’t confirmed whether or not it is that character.

I hope so.  That would be poetic.

Bryan has said that the next main “info dump” will come in October, but Nicholas Meyer and Kirsten Beyer are holding a discussion panel at the upcoming Mission: New York convention in a few days time and they might be authorised to drop a few more details.

Otherwise, we’re going to have to wait about a month for more news.

This is all pretty exciting stuff!  The pilot starts filming any day now (sometime in September) so there’s a chance we’ll get tantalising stills from the sets as January draws closer.

What information will come out next?  The best guess most of us who are monitoring Trek news can come up with, is that the next news items will be focused on casting.

We might get to learn who the new lead is, or if not, at the very least we might hear about some of her shipmates.  I think we’ll also get another look at the ship soon, probably not the final design, but another evolution.

As more news comes to light, I’ll be sure to post it here.

There are a couple of really good articles covering Bryan’s announcements over at the wonderful TrekCore.  To read them, click here and here.

Keep an eye out on Twitter.  Bryan sometimes drops teasers from his Twitter account, and if we see one we’ll repost it on our Twitter @SciFiSitesAus.  If it’s a big teaser, we’ll post it here on Star Trek: Sentinel.

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Warp Speed Ahead…

Star Trek Beyond Reviews and Updates

Days before it is officially released, Star Trek Beyond has been declared a critical success… at least as far as most critics are concerned.

There are, of course, some who have expressed a little disappointment, but thankfully there are only a few of them.

To date (July 19), Beyond has a 91% “fresh” rating on trusted review site Rotten Tomatoes – which is pretty damn good!


STB Rotten Tomotoes

If you’d like to read some of the reviews, see below.  Most are spoiler free, and those that aren’t contain minimal information.

TrekCore review

io9 review

TrekMovie review

TrekNews review

Blastr has a collection of comments/review snippets from various sources.

I haven’t seen the movie yet, but will rectify that in… oh… two days.  It’s probably safe to say I cannot wait!

So… how good is the movie?  So good Paramount have already announced a sequel – that will, apparently, feature Chris Hemsworth (yes, that Chris Hemsworth).

For those of you who don’t remember, Chris starred as the father of James T. Kirk in 2009’s Star Trek.  He broke our hearts, valiantly sacrificing his life to save his wife, his son (who was being born literally as the USS Kelvin was ripped apart by Nero’s vessel), and many of his fellow crew.

That sacrifice would become a turning point for a young James Kirk, thanks in no small part to Christopher Pike, who uttered these now immortal words: “…your father was captain of a starship for twelve minutes.  He saved 800 lives, including your mother’s and yours.  I dare you to do better.

We don’t know how George Kirk will return in the as yet untitled Star Trek IV, and I doubt we’ll find out for quite some time, but there are many ways in which a deceased character can make an appearance… via flashback (which is unlikely), as a recorded message, through a little time travel, or maybe even a crossover between the Prime Reality and the Kelvin timeline… it’s Star Trek, so the possibilities are endless.

To me, the most exciting possibility would be a crossover… so much potential in that one!

Star Trek Beyond is premiering in various locations around the world, and officially hits cinemas in three or four days – depending on which part of the world you live in.

According to a number of the reviews, it’s a worthy film to celebrate Star Trek‘s 50th birthday, effectively combining nostalgia and an old school Trekness with epic summer movie spectacle.

The latest film has been directed by Justin Lin and has been produced by J.J. Abrams from a screenplay by Simon Pegg and Doug Jung, and stars Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg, John Cho, the late Anton Yelchin, Sofia Boutella and Idris Elba.

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Star Trek Beyond and Series VI Trailers

Star Trek Update Banner - Beyond and Series VI

As anticipation builds for the release of Star Trek Beyond and the sixth live action Star Trek television series, two new trailers have dropped in the space of two days to remind us all that Star Trek is definitely alive and well in this, it’s 50th Anniversary year.

As well as two new trailers, there are two new movie posters, with one of them paying homage to the very first Star Trek movie poster ever, 1977’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

That poster was created by Bob Peak, a very famous Hollywood artist.  You can check out Bob’s work here.

The official Star Trek website has all the news on the two up and coming Trek productions, as well as a special focus on the recent major fan event that was held in Los Angeles on the 20th of May, featuring J.J. Abrams, Justin Lin and some of the stars of Star Trek Beyond.

You can go directly to the report on the special fan event by clicking here if you’re not in the mood to navigate through the site.

Now, let’s talk about the preview for the next film.

Star Trek Beyond Promotional Posters

The new trailer for Star Trek Beyond, and the second official trailer released by Paramount, is AMAZING.

I could break it all down for you, but that would be a waste of time because you really need to watch it.

As a long time fan, it feels like we might finally have a Star Trek feature film to rival the incredibly poignant and powerful Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Whereas the first trailer focused on action, action, action and more action, and had a slightly unexpected soundtrack blare out at us when we hit play, the second trailer takes us on a deeper journey, hinting at a movie that has just as much substance to it as it does noise and bluster.

The action is still there, but more importantly so too are the characters we’ve come to love, and for at least one of them, they’re at something of a crossroads in life that has the potential to add a whole other dimension to the film.

I know that Into Darkness was meant to be something of a homage to The Wrath of Khan, and one that fell short and was ultimately a little misguided, but this preview reminded me of the tone and feel of Wrath of Khan and what made that movie great, and it filled me with a new level of anticipation.

What makes Wrath of Khan so special for me and what makes it my gold standard for Star Trek films, is that the movie has grown with me.  When I first saw it, I wasn’t even a teenager.  At that impressionable age, what stood out was the epic space battle, the Ceti-Eels, Khan and how ruthless he was, and how much the crew of the Enterprise seemed like a family.

As the years have passed, I’ve come to appreciate just how multi-layered the movie is.  Kirk’s musings on life and his angst at being desk bound because he’s so experienced and others feel he should be guiding rather than doing, resonated with me when I found myself at a similar point in my career.  Uhura’s objection to Kirk’s comment that roaming the galaxy is a game for the young, speaks to me because I’m still bucking the fact that while I feel young, I’m actually cruising toward middle age.  These insights into something we all endure, the process of ageing and maturing, make me respond to the movie on a whole other level and look at life in a completely different way.  Kirk’s line, “I feel young”, still moves me to this day and reminds me that at every stage of life every single one of us has something invaluable and unique to offer.  Which, thanks to The Wrath of Khan, has become very much a big part of Star Trek‘s overall philosophy of inclusion.

Beyond appears to riff on similar universal experiences.  Kirk is trying to discover who he is, outside of the shadow of his father.  Spock cautions us on fear.  McCoy reminds us that it’s okay to fear death, so long as we remember to live.  The two plus minute trailer packs a whollop of emotion and action into it, from Uhura’s declaration her friend and Captain will come for her and the crew, to Shohreh Aghdashloo’s counsel on how easy it is to get lost, and her reminder that all we can really depend on in life are the people who undertake the journey with us.  Add to that a villain so steeped in hatred for the Federation and the very vision and ideals we as fans so admire, and the promise of an epic but intimately personal movie is made.

To watch the trailer, click here.

Below are a series of screencaps from the preview.  The first five photos show a pensive Kirk as he ponders what it means to ‘be’ Jim Kirk.  There’s also a unique shot of the Enterprise departing what might be the Yorktown, a starbase somewhere far from Earth.  We also see the first real new warp effect since the first movie in the reboot timeline – and it’s beautiful.  The screencap does not do it justice.  In any way.

The next five shots show the crew setting out, the attack by the swarm that cripples or destroys Enterprise, and a fantastic new shot of the deadly new enemy as they board the ship.

The following screencaps show what happens when you piss off a certain Communications Officer, McCoy following Jim’s order to abandon ship, and Kirk on the ground aiming a phaser at someone out of shot.

The next images show us that Uhura and Spock’s relationship is still going strong, that Spock and McCoy continue to rub each other the wrong way, and hints that Uhura and a great many of the Enterprise‘s crew fall into the hands of the film’s new villain, Krall.

The final screencaps show us an enemy learning all he can about James T. Kirk, Uhura warning that villain that their captain will come for them and he won’t be in a merciful mood, and two shots of the new heroine – Jaylah, played by Sofia Boutella.

One of the most surprising things about the new trailer was the ship it appears the Enterprise crew escapes in.

An NX class starship, last seen in Star Trek: Enterprise.  Could it be the USS Franklin?  The images below are grainy, but I swear it’s an NX vessel.  Watch the preview, and let me know if you agree!

All in all, this preview looks incredible.  I think Justin Lin has done it.

I was already excited to see this film, now I’m crazy-impatient to see it.  I can’t wait for the Australian premiere.  I’ll be lining up early and going multiple times.

Thank you, Paramount, Justin Lin, Simon Pegg and Doug Jung for what looks like it will be one of the best Star Trek films in a very long time, and maybe the best Star Trek film ever.

Star Trek Series VI Logo

A couple of days before the second official preview for Beyond broke, equally exciting news hit Star Trek fandom.

A teaser trailer for the new television series.

The trailer doesn’t show us anything, other than the beautiful new logo for the new production and a few gorgeous shots of Earth and deep space.

But, it does possibly answer one question many of us have been asking for a few weeks now – will the new Trek be an anthology show?

The answer is in the screencaps below.

New CREWS?  It doesn’t say, outright, that the new series will be an anthology series, but that’s one heck of a strong hint.

The last four screencaps from the teaser promise us new villains, new heroes and new worlds.

And I can’t wait!

After watching the teaser, I was left thinking that if it is an anthology series, it won’t just jump backward and forwards along one Trek timeline – it will also visit the alternate timeline created in 2009 by J.J. Abrams.

I have nothing to base that on, other than a lense flare effect I saw as I was watching the trailer that made me think of J.J..

When you think about it, it’s a simple way to meet every fans expectations.  A lot of fans prefer what is called the Prime Timeline, and some prefer what’s often called the AbramsVerse.  As well as honouring both, an anthology series opens up some very interesting story ideas as the writers explore Trek’s lengthy prime history across the 22nd, 23rd and 24th centuries, and how similar events might play out differently in the alternate timeline created by Nero.

The more I think about it, the more I hope they go the anthology route.

Things are starting to get very exciting for fans, and finally it’s starting to feel like the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek.

As more news comes to light, I’ll pop it up here… but right now, I’m  just going to pop up that beautiful homage to Star Trek: The Motion Picture one more time because I am in love with the new Beyond poster.

Star Trek Beyond Star Trek The Motion Picture Homage

Star Trek Beyond stars Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg, John Cho, Anton Yelchin, Sofia Boutella and Idris Elba, and was written by Simon Pegg and Doug Jung and directed by Justin Lin.

Star Trek Series VI is being developed by Alex Kurtzman, Bryan Singer, Rod Roddenberry, Heather Kadin, Trevor Roth and Nicholas Meyer.

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Star Trek Beyond Update – A New Character

Shohreh Aghdashloo Joins Star Trek Beyond

It’s been a little while since we heard anything about the upcoming Star Trek Beyond, due for release in 131 days (as of this writing).

The latest on the film is that reshoots are taking place.  That isn’t unusual for a Hollywood blockbuster, but what is unusual is that they are adding a brand new character into the film months after principal photography finished.

Shohreh Aghdashloo has joined the cast of Star Trek Beyond as a either the CinC of Starfleet or maybe even the President of the United Federation of Planets.  It’s a little unclear, with her character being described by Deadline and a number of Trek sites as the “High Command” of Starfleet.  That’s a sentence that doesn’t make sense.  “High Command” is a designation for an institution or organisation, not a position.

Whomever Shohreh is playing, we’ll no doubt find out soon.  What is important is that she is an incredible actor with some impressive credits to her name.

The 63 year old Iranian born actor has starred in numerous hits, first coming to the notice of audiences back in 2005 in the fourth season of the critically acclaimed 24, where she played a terrorist to chilling effect.

She is currently starring in The Expanse on the SyFy Channel as politician Chrisjen Avasarala.

Shohreh has a Daytime Emmy Award to her name, as well as a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in The House of Sand and Fog.

To read more about Shohreh, you can visit her Wikipedia page here.

What other changes are coming to Star Trek Beyond?

We don’t know yet.

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As I mentioned above, it’s not unusual for a film to be tweaked close to its release date, but it is unusual a new character be added and filmed after the completion of principal photography.

Does this mean the 13th Star Trek film is in trouble?

Maybe, but not necessarily so.

The worst thing that might have happened is that a preview audience saw the film and hated a part of it.  What most likely occurred was that the first cut was completed and Justin Lin and everyone else responsible for making the movie, felt it fell short in some area.  That might explain the reshoots and the addition of a new character.  Reshoots are more often than not a good sign and they can be an attempt to add an extra dimension or sense of depth to the story.

There is no doubt this film has everyone a little nervous… a new director, one of the actors co-wrote it, and it’s coming out in the 50th Anniversary year where expectations are higher than usual.  There was also the disappointing performance of the first trailer released a couple of months ago which felt very ‘unTrek’ like.  Justin Lin and Simon Pegg have attempted to assure us the film has not sacrificed story for action, but some fans were left unconvinced.

As more information comes to light, I’ll make sure to toss it up here.

I’m still looking forward to the 22nd of July, and even more so now that Shohreh Aghdashloo is involved.  I’ve been a fan since 2005 and I am thrilled she’s now a part of Star Trek.

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Tour the USS Enterprise D!

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While we can’t jump on a shuttle or step into a transporter and be transported to the USS Enterprise D in real life… we will soon be able to do it virtually.

TrekMovie are reporting that thanks to the “Enterprise 3D Project” fans will soon be able to walk down the halls of that famous ship and duck onto the bridge while they’re at it.

The project is still a work in progress, but if you visit TrekMovie right here you will see it’s shaping up pretty nicely.

If you would like to learn more about the project, you can go straight to the Enterprise D Construction Project website here and discover all the different ways in which the artist is working to make this as memorable an experience for fans as is possible.

Visit the site, and share some love for this fan who is using his talent and no doubt a great deal of patience, to make this project something special for all of us.

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Nu-Trek III Update – Starship Down and Less Scotty?

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Is Star Trek Beyond a case of Enterprise down?

New photos from the set of the next Trek film currently filming in Canada, show what appears to be a crashed Federation starship.  It has the wonderful team over at TrekCore asking the question “is it the Enterprise…?”

It’s not an unreasonable question.

When you look at the history of the Enterprise on film, she does seem to have a bad trot every third movie.  Star Trek: The Motion Picture, she’s okay.  Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, she’s pretty badly beaten up.  Star Trek III: The Search for Spock… KABANG!  She’s rebuilt in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and given a shiny ‘A’, but we barely get to see her. She makes it through Star Trek V: The Final Frontier relatively unscathed, only to get smashed up in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.  She survives that film (barely), but is scheduled to be decommissioned and as the film ends, we’re not entirely sure what happens to her.

Could NuTrek be about to follow suit and give us a new Enterprise at the end of Star Trek Beyond?

Check out the article over at TrekCore right here for a little more information and to see the photos of what looks like part of our favourite starship’s crashed saucer section.

As well as the intriguing shots of a possible crashed Enterprise, TrekCore is also featuring an article on Simon Pegg.  Simon tells Trek fans that the movie is still going through minor rewrites, and probably will be tweaked right up to the last shooting day.  That isn’t that strange, especially for a major film, but on top of admitting to the odd rewrite, Simon suggests that as a result of him needing to focus on those, Scotty might end up having reduced screen time.

In a recent interview with the UK’s Metro website, Simon said the following:

There is a lot of pressure [to finish the script]. The way movie-making works these days is that as soon as you have a structure, when all the sets and the physical aspects of the film are locked in, the dialogue and stuff is always a moveable feat. We’ll be writing it right up until the edit, I think.  The pressure to get a kind of set structure is on, but for everything else, it’s a work in progress.  I feel like [Scotty’s role will be] less, because I’m going to have to be on set all the time anyway, as a writer, so I should write myself out so I can have time to be the writer.”

Scotty Star Trek Into Darkness

Hopefully Scotty’s role won’t be reduced.  Simon Pegg is great as the iconic Scottsman, and the actors that J.J. Abrams assembled to reboot Star Trek for a new generation, are incredible as an ensemble cast.

Guess we’ll find out in about eleven months!

If you’d like to read more, head over to the article at TrekCore here.  The original article at UK’s Metro website is here.


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