Season 2 Excitement Grows

Michael Enters Spock's Quarters

The much anticipated Star Trek: Short Treks has kicked off, with the first episode airing last week in the United States and Canada.

If you’re an international viewer about to reach for your Netflix account to go check it out, don’t bother.  We’re still waiting, and sadly, it looks like we’ll be waiting for a while.

Netflix, the international streaming rights holder for Star Trek: Discovery, have no plans to carry the between-seasons mini-episodes at this time.

If, like me, you’re not happy about that, I recommend you let Netflix know by visiting this link and requesting the show.

The first episode of Short Treks is a Tilly-centric adventure called “Runaway.” Reviews online have been a little mixed but mostly positive.  What I’ve read is enticing, and I really want to see one scene in particular where Tilly apparently explains away a ruined mess hall by blaming it all on an hyperactive and destructive hormonal space rabbit!

Tilly from the Episode Runaway - Star Trek Short Treks

If you don’t want to wait for Netflix to pull their finger out and stream Short Treks, and want more information on the episode, you can check out a spoiler free review here, by Anthony Pascale from the wonderful TrekMovie website.

In other news, there has been an avalanche of Star Trek: Discovery related reveals in recent days, with most of them coming hot on the heels of CBS releasing the Season Two promo poster and a new trailer for the show.  The poster features the mystical “red angel” that we learn more about in the new trailer, which appears to have a link to Spock – and, it would appear, Michael.

Star Trek Discovery Season 2 Logo

The poster is simple, and features the seven lights that Captain Pike mentions in the first trailer, with the Angel right in the very centre of the Starfleet Delta.  The poster is minimalist, beautiful, evocative and appropriately mysterious.

For those of you who don’t remember, this new season is meant to be an exploration of science and faith and the poster presents that effectively.

As mentioned, there is a new trailer out and it is awesome and packed full of excitement and surprises.  We get our first glimpses of Ethan Peck as Spock and Rebecca Romijn as Number One.

I really expected them to hold those two particular surprises over until just before the season launch.

I’m glad they didn’t!

We also get a lot more of Captain Christopher Pike.

Want a closer look at Spock, and another look at Number One?

We’re here to please.

Spock is sporting a more rugged look than usual, foreshadowing his future Star Trek: The Motion Picture Kolinahr look.

I haven’t heard any backlash from fans about Spock’s dishevelled appearance yet, which is good.

I like the foreshadowing and how it adds more depth to this iconic character, in a way that is consistent with things we will see Spock do in the future.  He’s always been a character adrift, seeking somewhere and some way to belong, and, despite his adherence to logic, has always been a deeply spiritual individual.  He left Starfleet to undertake the rigorous Kolinahr ritual, and didn’t continue his quest for pure logic when he failed, even though the Masters would have probably let him, because his soul/heart/intellect felt the pull of something “greater.”

At heart, Spock is a scientist with an insatiable curiosity, but he’s also a seeker, someone open to exploring space and the inner most depths of his own complicated psyche.

As stated above, alongside Spock we get to see the new Number One, and Rebecca Romijn looks perfect in the role.  There were times while watching the trailer that I thought Majel Barrett-Roddenberry had come back, magically 50 years younger.

Rebecca is channeling the essence of this fan-favourite character, building on the work of Gene and Majel superbly.

In the brief moments we get to see Number One, she is poised, exuding obvious intelligence while also expressing compassion and concern. There is a level of measured maturity present that was also there in Majel’s portrayal and all I can say is the producers chose well.

I know some fans are a little disappointed that the Enterprise crew play a role in this season, but I am incredibly happy they’re included. Star Trek is the original shared universe, made so famous in recent times by Marvel, and it doesn’t hurt to remind Geekdom that we did it first, and we still do it really well.

I maintain my original prediction that this entire season is a sort of backdoor pilot for a Pike Enterprise series, and I really hope I’m right.

I’d watch that show.

Apart from the Spock and Number One surprises, the trailer treads familiar ground while still managing to throw the odd curve ball.

The Klingons appear, as does former Empress Philippa Georgiou.

As hinted in recent months, the Klingons have had something of a redesign and now come with hair.  All of them.  The in-universe explanation for this is that, traditionally, Klingons shave their heads for war.  Obviously, come Picard’s era, that tradition has been done away with.

What I’m about to write is an incredibly unpopular view, but I never liked the soft rock/soft metal look of the movie and Star Trek: The Next Generation era Klingons.  Their flowing locks never made sense.  All that beautiful hair waving around on a battlefield, to me, was just asking for an intergalactic hair-pulling fight of titanic proportions.

The streamlined, more predatory Klingons of Star Trek: Discovery Season One look dangerous.  They don’t look like they’re about to launch into a Bon Jovi cover.  Yes, there were issues with the heavy makeup and prosthetics, but the bald look made sense for a warrior race.

Still, this in-universe logic they’ve created makes sense and I’m happy to buy it.

L'Rell With Hair

Georgious’s appearance was of course alluded to in the deleted scene that made the rounds at the conclusion of Season One.

As that scene suggested, she would return as a part of the covert Section 31.  Not everyone knows that, and only a select few know that this Georgiou is from another universe.

Captain Pike?  He is completely unaware.  So… that should be interesting!  Mirror-Georgiou is most definitely not the rationale, reasoned, compassionate Starfleet officer Captain Pike will remember and it remains to be seen what he will make of this different version.

Last season’s cover story is still being used.  Georgiou was rescued from a Klingon prison at the end of the war.

Maybe Starfleet is hoping her quirks can be explained away as trauma, and not the actions of a frustrated former Empress who is a sociopathic megalomaniac from another universe.

Georgiou Returns

The last bit of news is that the new season will premiere January 17th in the United States and Canada, which means it will come to Australia January 18th.

There’s more news on Season Two thanks to the New York Comic Con, but I won’t spoil it here.  If you want to learn more, visit TrekMovie and read this article.

If you haven’t seen the new Season Two preview yet, watch it here.  This is the international trailer available from Netflix.

We don’t have long to wait now.

Season Two looks like it’s going to be quite different, in a good way, from what was (in my opinion) an excellent first season.

Star Trek: Discovery is available in the United States on CBS All Access, and is available on Space and CraveTV in Canada.  For international viewers, the series is available exclusively on Netflix.

Remember, if you’re one of those international viewers, put a little pressure on Netflix so we can enjoy Short Treks too.

LCARS Interface

Star Trek Beyond Review

Star Trek Beyond Review Banner

“We will find hope in the impossible…”
Spock

I was pretty keen… okay, I was borderline desperate to see the new Star Trek movie on its day of release here in Australia, but life conspired against me – as it does for all of us now and again, and I had to put it off.  After some thought, I decided to torture myself and wait until Gene Roddenberry’s birthday to see it.  I liked the idea of watching this particular movie, released to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of my favourite television and movie series, on the birthday of the phenomena’s creator.

The wait was agonising.

Thankfully today (in Australia at least) is the Great Bird of the Galaxy’s birthday, and I watched the film, cheering on Gene’s creation throughout.

So first…  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, GENE!

If he were alive today, the Great Bird of the Galaxy would have turned 95.  I’m fairly certain, if he were still with us, that he would have been chuffed (maybe even quietly surprised) to see that his little show that could was still going strong 50 years on.  I think he would also be feeling proud of his son, and in particular Rob’s involvement in bringing a new Trek to another generation alongside some of the brightest lights in Star Trek and modern television production.

Star Trek Beyond?  If he had had the chance to watch the film I’m certain he would have enjoyed it.  He would have loved the character moments and the dynamics, and many of the choices Justin, Simon and Doug made.

So, again, happy birthday Gene.  You gave us such a wonderful gift, and in return many people are still doing their utmost to honour your incredible vision.

As much as the wait to see Beyond drove me a little crazy, I was right, watching the film on the 19th of August added extra layers to the experience, and it was worth the delay.

The movie?

I LOVED IT!

I know a few reviewers have not enjoyed the film, or only enjoyed bits and pieces of it, but I enjoyed at least 121 of the 122 minutes it was on screen.  From those first unique but beautiful shots of the Enterprise to the last credit as it rolled and the lights came on in the cinema, I felt like I was in the final frontier.

It’s nothing like 2009’s Star Trek, or 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness.  It’s nothing like any Star Trek film that’s gone before it.  If I were forced to try and find a comparison, I’d say it’s most like Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, but only in it’s execution because it does split our characters up and give them all a slight chance to shine, just like that film did.  But the comparison ends there.

The film is funny, like The Voyage Home, but it’s also moving and poignant just like The Wrath of Khan, The Search for Spock, and parts of The Undiscovered Country.

There are shades of The Wrath of Khan in the conversations between McCoy and Kirk, and there’s a very slight echo of Star Trek: Insurrection in the way Krall callously disregards the lives of others to lengthen his own, but despite those familiar notes, Beyond is it’s own film.

It’s not a perfect movie, but it’s faults are minor.

One such fault is with the amount of time the big seven get on screen.  We didn’t see anywhere near enough of Uhura, Chekov or Sulu.  Despite that, thankfully, the movie wasn’t dominated by Kirk, Spock, Scotty or McCoy.  I believe it’s just about as balanced as it could be.

Another fault was with the build up to, and actual revelation of Krall’s story and motivation.

It seemed rushed to me.  It needed and deserved more focus.

None of that detracted from my enjoyment of the film.  Those criticisms are minor, and they don’t “throw you out” of the movie.

Star Trek Beyond is a journey that wraps you up in its narrative and doesn’t let you go.

The standout moments in the film are the simply beautiful, perfect performances of the entire cast and the really wonderful and meaningful interactions between the main seven characters.  Those are what make Beyond shine.  The best of those happen between Spock and McCoy (who actually steal the entire movie).  Why has it taken three films to discover the remarkable chemistry between Zachary Quinto and Karl Urban?

The remainder of this review is going to have a few spoilers in it, so if you haven’t seen the film yet and don’t want to know anything about it, don’t keep reading!

Oh… and GO SEE IT!!

Spoiler Alert

“To the Enterprise… and to absent friends.”
James T. Kirk

The Direction and Vision

I didn’t know what to expect from Justin Lin.  Unlike a lot of other people I wasn’t expecting The Fast and The Furious with phasers.  I had researched Justin and knew he wasn’t a Michael Bay whose movies are all so similar regardless of their story or genre.  He has some impressive films under his belt, which to me just meant I couldn’t go in expecting any particular visual style.

And I was right.  What I got was something unexpected and new and very welcome.

Justin has crafted a film that is nothing like any other Star Trek.  His visual signature is unique for this series of movies, and it’s predecessors, and it works.

Justin’s direction was marred, just a tiny bit, by one or two editing choices, but his style is beautiful, expansive and dynamic.  It flows and makes sense, and doesn’t treat the audience like they’re idiots who need every bridging moment in a film spelled out for them.

Justin’s camera is almost always in motion, and this brings a fluidity to the movie that makes it feel majestic and epic.

On top of the visual style of the film, Justin’s overall vision for this instalment of Star Trek was BIG, and he delivered that in spades – and in some very subtle ways: our glimpses of the crew at day 966 in deep space, Kirk’s obvious exhaustion during a diplomatic meeting and his tired comment “I ripped my shirt again”, the progression of the crew’s relationships (in particular Spock and Uhura’s).  These simple scenes conveyed the passage of time, and by doing that the massive distances the crew would have travelled.  Justin also presented the ‘hugeness’ of space in some very obvious ways: the big and beautiful, panoramic shots of the Enterprise at the start of the film, the new warp effect, and just how small our favourite ship was against the vastness of space.

Apart from making space feel big and dangerous again, Justin, Simon and Doug wanted to challenge the very founding principles of the Federation in this film and asked some interesting questions, while presenting an age old argument.

The questions?  Does the Federation live up to its high ideals?  Was it founded on those ideals, or was it founded on (in Krall’s belief) a lie?

The age old argument?  “War, chaos and struggle breeds strength.”

These were good questions and a good premise to build the film on for this, the 50th year of Star Trek‘s life.  I don’t know if they pulled off what they wanted to pull off to the depth they would have liked, but the ideas were raised and as a long time fan, were appreciated.

Above the ideas though, was the way the movie made me feel.

Justin’s directing style made me smile so many times.  And maybe that’s the key?  I wasn’t just blown away by the visuals, I was carried away by the story and swept up in the lives of the characters in a way that made me feel good.  The emotion in the movie connected with me on a really deep level, more than any special effect ever could.

Justin brought so many different things to the table as the Director of this film, and he didn’t shy away from putting his own design stamp on the Kelvin timeline Trek.  One such stamp was the design of Starbase Yorktown… it is simply incredible.  Photos do not do it justice.   Everything about the Yorktown is stunning.  The design is astounding – a confusion of glass and steel that wends and winds its way through the interior of an enormous glass sphere in space, and every inch of her makes you believe this place is real.

We pretty much start the movie at the starbase (after an hilariously disastrous diplomatic mission), and the starbase plays a major part in the film’s tense climax.  We also get to see, at the very end of the film, that the Yorktown is more than just a deep space base of operations for the Federation, it’s also the birth place of the brand new USS Enterprise A.

There’s so much to love about this film.  I now know why so many reviewers have compared Beyond to an original series episode.  It doesn’t feel like an overblown Star Trek episode on steroids like so many Next Gen movies did, but it most definitely has an original series sensibility and energy that makes it more Star Trek than any of the Kelvin timeline films to date.

I swear I picked multiple music and visual homages from the original series and original series films, and even the new uniforms are more original series than those seen in the first two films.  I didn’t think I was going to like the new uniforms, because they looked a little bland in the production stills, but I loved them.  They’re quite smart, and they look good on our heroes.

Justin Lin did an incredible job.  Star Trek Beyond is a strong film and it’s set a new standard for Star Trek movies.  I hope he gets to do Star Trek IV.

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“Mr. Sulu… you can… fly this thing, right?”
James T. Kirk

The Editing

For most of the movie, it’s good to flawless… but there were times where it was jarring, and you were momentarily knocked out of the movie by an editing choice that didn’t match the flow of the film.

Like I indicated above, that might just be because Justin made a movie that was so fluid, when an obvious scene cut happens it’s so unexpected you do a double take.  I’ll have to see the movie again to better analyse my reaction.

I don’t have anything else to say about the editing, because for 98% of the time it’s excellent, but I would love to speak to the film’s editors to try and understand some of their choices… were they artistic decisions?  Were they meant to create an emotional reaction?  Were they to cut the film down because it was running too long?  Why were they made?  That was one of the bigger questions I came away with regarding this latest Trek.

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“It isn’t uncommon, you know?  It’s easy to get lost.  In the vastness of space,
there’s only yourself, your ship, your crew.”

Commodore Paris

The Special Effects

I’ve heard a lot of complaints about the effects, but I was happy with them.  Some of them are extraordinary!

As mentioned above, the camera was almost always in motion, and at times that did make certain effects look a little blurred or unrealised, but there were enough outstanding set pieces that were perfect that you just went with it.  In some people’s minds that might have been a poor choice on the filmmakers’ behalf, but I personally enjoyed the way the movie flowed.

Those set pieces?

The Yorktown, and in particular the Enterprise‘s entry into and exit from it, were simply beautiful and actually surprising.  The heart-breaking but spectacular destruction of the Enterprise was another jaw-dropping moment that was gorgeous to watch as it tore your heart out and stomped on it.

The wave of swarm ships that the Franklin “disrupts” toward the end of the movie were also really well done, as were the running phaser fights on the Enterprise as she was boarded and the escape pod sequences looked great too.  I jumped almost every time a swarm ship captured one of the small pods.

There were some corny bits, like the holo-projected Jaylah’s and Kirks, but they were executed flawlessly – so by and large the effects were fun and they worked.  They did exactly what they needed to do and complemented the film and for once, for a blockbuster, did not drown out the story in favour of more flash and bang.

I love watching a movie that dazzles me with amazing effects but doesn’t overwhelm me.  I want to be sucked into a film and to feel like everything in that movie supports the story and its characters, and isn’t there just to provoke a reaction.  I’m personally pretty tired of special effects for the sake of special effects and it was such a relief to see Star Trek Beyond find that perfect balance.

Nothing in Beyond felt superfluous or over done and that’s a real testament to everyone involved.

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“You spent all this time trying to be your father, and now you’re
wondering just what it means to be you.”
Leonard McCoy

The Story and the Acting

For me, the small stories inside the big story were the most enjoyable:
– Kirk’s early mid-life crisis;
– Uhura and Spock’s relationship and Spock struggling between his love for Nyota and his obligation to his species;
– Shipboard life after more than 900 days in space and the ups and downs for the crew;
– Spock and McCoy and their friendship;
– McCoy and Kirk and their friendship, and;
– Spock dealing with the death of his older self.

The big story was good, but it wasn’t as strong as it could have been.  It felt like Star Trek Beyond needed another thirty minutes to get everything just right.

Krall was probably the best villain since Khan and the Borg Queen.  He was magnetic, ruthless, driven and impressive in every way.  His motivations were understandable – but at a stretch, because they weren’t given the due attention they needed to make his narrative sing, and as a result fell a bit flat.

As much as a good film needs a great ‘bad guy’, I think it was clear that this film was not about that conflict and so it’s a little easy to overlook the slight misstep that was taken with Krall’s story.  Beyond was about the family that is the crew of the USS Enterprise, and it was a love letter to us, the fans… and Simon Pegg, Doug Jung and Justin Lin pull those two things off brilliantly.

If I were forced to pick something that disappointed me about the film, there was only one thing that niggled.  The use of Chekov.  We don’t get to spend much time with him, and in a film that was such an ensemble piece that grated on me.

It is a big cast, and that will always mean someone will come off second best, but teaming Chekov with Kirk was a mistake because Kirk is always going to dominate every scene he is in.  That’s got nothing to do with acting talent, but it does have everything to do with character.  Kirk is bigger than life, and he’s the guy in charge so we’re always going to expect him to take charge.

Normally I’d be okay with one or two characters getting a little less, because there’s usually the promise of another film (or in TV Trek another episode) and another chance for that character to grow.  This time, that’s not the case because we lost Anton Yelchin a few short weeks ago.

Justin, Simon and Doug couldn’t have known that was going to happen, and Anton’s death was so close to the release of the film that there was no way a new edit could be done, and so we’re left hoping that a Directors Edition DVD and BluRay may shine a bit more of a light on everyone’s favourite Russian Navigator.

But, back to the positives!  While the story is relatively simple, it was executed in a less than traditional way.  That’s what makes this movie stand head and shoulders above every other previous Trek film.  The Kelvin timeline Star Trek has often been promoted as an ensemble series, but Kirk has always been the hero – he joins the away mission to disable Nero’s drilling platform in the first film and then takes over the Captain’s chair when Pike gets captured.  He works out Khan is about to attack Starfleet HQ in the second film, and flies through debris with Khan in that same movie to stop the Vengeance.

In Beyond, all of that was turned on its head a bit.  Yes, Kirk was heroic, but he wasn’t THE hero.

McCoy got to do a bit of that, so did Spock, but the most heroic act belonged to Uhura when she willingly sacrificed herself to save her friends.

Thankfully, we didn’t lose her, but the character could not have known she would survive that tense moment.

It was a totally unexpected move that had me on the edge of my seat!  Not too far along in the movie, the swarm attack on the Enterprise takes everyone by surprise.  They’re approaching a planet called Altamid on a rescue mission when everything goes to crap!  The ship is ripped apart, the saucer section is falling toward the planet and can’t engage it’s engines because the neck is still attached, so Kirk runs off to try and separate the broken neck from the saucer section so he can save his crew.

Kirk gets way-laid by the movie’s big bad, Krall, and Uhura rushes to help.  While Kirk battles Krall, Uhura fights her way through swarm warriors to discover there is no chance Kirk can perform the manual saucer separation procedure.  In that moment she makes the decision to sacrifice herself and releases the saucer saving Kirk and her friends.  As Kirk looks on, shocked, she and Krall plummet toward Altamid’s surface.

Star Trek Beyond has quite a few of those unexpected turns that give our heroes a chance to actually be heroic.

It’s such a nice change.  While Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home provided similar opportunities, the heroics were often overshadowed by the fish-out-of-water comedy.  Beyond doesn’t do that, it gives the actors some “meat” to chew on and they run with it with gusto and talent.

The Acting?  There’s no need to comment on it.  Chris Pine, Zoe Saldana, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg, John Cho and Anton Yelchin are gifted.  When you add in Shoreh Aghdashloo, Sofia Boutella and Idris Elba, you have one outstanding performance after another.

As mentioned above, Chekov is the only character who doesn’t really get much of an opportunity to shine.

Special mentions:
Sofia Boutella.  She is exquisite as Jaylah.  We all need to watch this young woman because she is going to take Hollywood by storm.
Idris Elba.  I know Idris has quite an acting resume, but he didn’t come to my attention until Thor.  He’s so impressive.  They stuck him under a mountain of latex and it didn’t stop him.  Idris brought Krall to life and he stole every scene he was in.
Chris Pine.  This is his best performance as Kirk to date.  He sells Kirk’s emotional journey beautifully.
Zoe Saldana.  She is fearless as Uhura.  She has a few moments that require some serious acting talent, and she pulls them off beautifully.  It’s not hard to see why Zoe is hot property and in so many films.  Her part in Beyond is smaller than it was in the two previous Treks, but that didn’t deter Zoe one bit.  If anything, she made the most of every second she was on screen.
Zachary Quinto.  I don’t even know where to begin.  His performance is the stand out of the entire movie.  Spock goes on a roller-coaster journey during this film and Zachary is astounding every step of the way.  I have always thought Zach was a fine actor, but he’s better than that.  If he doesn’t get an Academy Award one day, I will be deeply disappointed.  Spock has long been one of my favourite characters, but Zachary deepened my love for the character and I had not thought that was possible.  With Leonard’s death last year, it’s like Zach felt the weight of that one man’s legacy and decided that to honour him and to honour Spock he was going to go to an entirely new level.  His performance is such a beautiful homage and nod of absolute respect to Leonard Nimoy.  I want to watch the movie again, but I REALLY want to watch it again just to focus on his performance and let it carry me away.

An extra special mention needs to go to the duo of Zachary Quinto and Karl Urban.  Together, those men are pure magic.

The only disappointment in the acting department was how little we got to see of the always incredible Shoreh Aghdashloo.

Commodore Paris was a welcome addition and I wish we’d gotten to spend more time with her.

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“Let’s make some noise.”
James T. Kirk

The Music

This can be summed up in one simple sentence: Michael Giacchino has done it again.

Michael has, for all three reboot films, managed to weave in classic Trek compositions and original music to create something special.  This is his best Trek score to date, with some truly unique themes peppered throughout the soundtrack.

The music is atmospheric and memorable.

Enough said!

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“Space: the final frontier.”
James T. Kirk
“These are the voyages of the starship…”
Spock
“…Enterprise.  Its continuing mission…”
Montgomery Scott
“…to explore strange, new worlds…”
Leonard McCoy
“….to seek out new life…”
Hikaru Sulu
“…and new civilisations…”
Pavel Chekov
“…to boldy go where no-one has gone… before.”
Nyota Uhura

Extra Bits and Summing it Up

As most, if not all Star Trek fans know, we lost two shining lights in the Star Trek galaxy recently.  Leonard Nimoy and Anton Yelchin.

To recognise Leonard’s death, a Vulcan delegation approached Spock on the Yorktown to advise him (and us) of Prime Spock’s passing.  Later in the movie, Spock was given his older self’s possessions and in one beautiful scene the whole 50 years of Star Trek was honoured.

For long term fans that scene was full of emotion, both in the moment we saw it onscreen and afterwards as we reflected on it.  On the moment it was a beautiful homage.  In reflection, in that moment we had Spock’s love for his crew mates confirmed for us.  It was something we always suspected, and it was something Spock showed time and again in the series and movies, but it was bang in front of us in those closing moments of Star Trek Beyond.

What am I talking about?  If you haven’t seen the film yet, it appears Spock often travelled with a few possessions that meant a lot to him.  He had those possessions with him when he left on his mission to save the Romulan star in 2009’s Star Trek.  Of those possessions, one item in particular is of interest to fans – a photo of his oldest and dearest friends, Kirk, McCoy, Scotty, Uhura, Sulu and Chekov.  The reveal of the photo (a promotional image from Star Trek V: The Final Frontier) was a moment that brought tears to my eyes, and I’m sure I’m not the only fan who was moved.

One of the most beautiful things about that scene was the glimpse the younger Spock received of just how deep those relationships, which are still relatively new to him, were destined to go.

It was a perfect moment.

STV Enterprise A Crew Photo

For Anton, it was an equally small but perfect moment.

At the the very end of the film we celebrate Jim Kirk’s birthday.  During that, Kirk gives a toast and says the words “…to absent friends…”.  It’s an echo of a scene played out in another reality, after Kirk and crew lost their friend Spock and their ship.

Kirk toasts Spock and the Enterprise in Star Trek III The Search for Spock

As the Kelvin timeline Kirk says those words the camera is moving around the entire cast, but lingers on Anton for a noticeable moment as those words are spoken.  It was beautiful.  The lighting shifted slightly, and Chekov was bathed in a subtle golden aura.

If I had to sum the whole movie up, those two scenes are good examples to use because Star Trek Beyond is nostalgic, sensitive, self-aware without being ironic (and making fun of itself like so many of the Next Gen films seemed to do), and it’s inclusive.  It helped if you knew Star Trek, but if you weren’t familiar with it you could still enjoy the film and feel something special.

Throughout Beyond you feel like the characters you love have grown and changed and developed and become more than archetypes or two-dimensional creations on a screen.  Time has passed, it’s affected them, and it’s brought out the good as well as the not so good in them.  Like every human being (or human Vulcan hybrid), they’re struggling through that and trying to do and be their best.

I can’t wrap up this review without making a comment about the tumult surrounding the revelation that Sulu is gay.

It’s handled beautifully.  As the Enterprise approaches the Yorktown at the beginning of the movie, we see an image of Sulu’s daughter.  In that moment it’s clear he’s a father.  After the ship docks and the crew disembark for shore leave, we see Kirk watching Sulu approach a man and a young girl, and we see Kirk smile warmly and a little wistfully as Sulu’s arm goes around his husband’s waist and he nuzzles his daughter and they walk off together.

It’s a brief scene, but such a perfect one.  The revelation wasn’t treated as a “thing”, and Sulu wasn’t different as a result.  He’s the same Sulu we loved in the 2009 film, and the same Sulu who so effectively took command of the Enterprise in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness.  The only thing that changed was that he deepened as a character and that is fantastic.

Rihanna’s “Sledgehammer”?  It sounds wonderful in a cinema.  I liked “Sledgehammer” when I first heard it, but did not go and download it right away.  Then I watched the movie, heard that song on those enormous surround sound speakers and truly appreciated that piece of music.  I also “got” how it helped Zoe Saldana and Zachary Quinto deal with the death of Anton.  It’s a beautiful song, made all the more so by the tragic passing of such a young and talented actor.

If you haven’t seen Star Trek Beyond yet, you need to.  You really need to.

There is so much to love about Star Trek Beyond.  Don’t listen to the critics who have panned it.  It’s obvious something has died inside those people somewhere over the years, because it’s not just a good film, it’s a great film, and it treats Star Trek and it’s fans with the respect we all deserve.

Star Trek Beyond gets five out of five Starfleet Deltas from me.
Five Starfleet Deltas

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Star Trek Beyond Update

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There’s a little over a month until the international release of Star Trek Beyond, and we’re starting to get a decent amount of information on the new movie.

Star Wars fans everywhere will slap me for this, but my anticipation for Star Trek Beyond has hit the same level it hit (for me) in the lead up to Star Wars: The Force Awakens.  That level of anticipation was pretty huge.

So… with more news coming out about the film than ever before, where to begin?

TrekCore, one of the best Star Trek news sites out there, has a brilliant look at the new uniforms in Star Trek Beyond right here, and they are beautiful.  I really like the biker style get up that Kirk and Chekov wear in the previews – the detail in those two costumes is fantastic.

Three new TV spots have also recently been released by Paramount pictures, and you can watch them on YouTube herehere and here.  While you’re checking them out, show some love to ComicBook.com and their YouTube channel for posting the previews.

What else?

Well… the wonderfully talented Karl Urban recently came clean on some of his favourite things about Star Trek, including his favourite film.

I’ve been a fan of Karl’s since I saw him in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.  His portrayal of Leonard McCoy merely cemented that for me.  Now, I respect him even more – because we both love one particular Trek movie, despite the fact it’s one of the least liked out there.

To read that interview with Karl, visit IGN here.  You can quickly see he is a true fan of Star Trek and is pretty damn knowledgable about that universe.

Lastly, the two actors playing Star Trek‘s couple of the decade, Zoe Saldana and Zachary Quinto, spoke to EW about the upcoming feature film, where Uhura and Spock’s relationship is at, and just how much this new enemy will challenge the Enterprise crew and the United Federation of Planets.

It’s similar to a lot of what we’ve heard in recent months, but Zoe and Zachary do dive a little more into Spock’s journey and how he loves Uhura deeply, but feels conflicted because he wonders if he should be with a Vulcan woman, helping rebuild his homeworld’s civilisation after it was almost wiped out in 2009’s Star Trek.

To read the article over at Screenrant, click here.

That’s pretty much all of the major news that’s come out in recent weeks.

There are some other bits and pieces of news available out there, and if you’re in the mood to navigate through a few sites for some additional information, I highly recommend TrekCoreTrekMovie and TrekNews.

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75 Days and Counting

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As of the 7th of May, it’s only 75 days until the release of Star Trek Beyond.

As we all wait with baited breath to see this movie that is wrapped up with so much hope and weighed down with so many fans’ concerns, the people behind the film are finally starting to give us some additional insight into this third voyage into the alternate timeline created by 2009’s Star Trek.

First, Paramount recently registered the title “Star Trek 4” with the Motion Picture Association of America.

Does this mean there’s already a fourth movie ready to shift into pre-production?

No.

But, it does mean Parmount has faith the new Trek film will do well.  So much so, both Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto are signed for another sequel.

For more information on this, visit TrekMovie here.

Not long after Paramount registered the generic title for a potential fourth movie, a little more news came out – from the film’s new director, the talented franchise saviour Justin Lin, and one of the film’s stars John Cho.

In an interview with 1905.com, an official subsidiary of the China Movie Channel, Justin spoke at length on the efforts he and his fellow creatives went to, to make the new movie about character.  Action remains important, because the film will be a major blockbuster for the studio, but Justin is convinced he’s struck a good balance between spectacular explosions and other action set pieces, and beautiful and meaningful character moments.

To read the article at TrekCore click here.

John Cho also spoke on the character moments that Justin focused on in the new movie, commenting on how – more than any other Star Trek film in the reboot series – Beyond feels truest to the original series.

To read more from John’s interview, visit the always brilliant TrekCore here.

Finally, Sofia Boutella is in the recording booth doing some post production work on the new film, in time for its imminent release.

Sofia recently did some ADR work (Automatic Dialogue Replacement) for the new film, which is common for pretty much every major production.

ADR is used to clean up dialogue that might not have been caught during filming, or might have been spoiled by another sound intruding that either wasn’t picked up by the sound people, or was picked up with the Director deciding it could be corrected in post without going to the extra expense of resetting a scene and filming yet another in what might have been a long series of takes.

To read a little bit more, visit TrekCore again here.

That’s it for now.  With a little over two months until the movie comes out, we’ll no doubt hear more about the film and see more – especially when the next trailer drops later this month.

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Zachary Quinto Wins GLSEN 2015 Champion Award

GLSEN Award 2015

A few days ago, the annual GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) Respect Awards were held in Beverly Hills at the Beverly Wilshire.

Among the winners was Trek’s own Zachary Quinto, who won the GLSEN Champion Award!

According to the website, the awards were introduced in 2004 and showcase the work of students, educators, individuals and corporations who serve as exemplary role models, and who have made a significant impact on the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people.

Zachary Quinto Banner

For those who didn’t know, Zach came out as gay in 2011, not long after the suicide of Jamey Rodemeyer – a young bisexual man who took his life because of bullying.

Zach made this post on his website about the tragic incident and about why he came out:

“When I found out that Jamey Rodemeyer killed himself – I felt deeply troubled.  But when I found out that Jamey Rodemeyer had made an It Gets Better video only months before taking his own life –  I felt indescribable despair.  I also made an It Gets Better video last year – in the wake of the senseless and tragic gay teen suicides that were sweeping the nation at the time.  But in light of Jamey’s death – it became clear to me in an instant that living a gay life without publicly acknowledging it – is simply not enough to make any significant contribution to the immense work that lies ahead on the road to complete equality.”

If you’d like to read the rest of Zach’s post you can right here.

One of the things I love about Star Trek is it’s vision of an inclusive future where humanity has moved beyond things like racism, sexism, social class and, of course, homophobia.

It takes courage to come out, and it takes additional courage to then be an advocate for others, and Zachary has shown that time and time again since letting his homosexuality ‘leak’ in an interview he did a few years ago.

The universe of Star Trek is lucky to have such amazing role models in it, people who have stood up against racism and homophobia – Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, Zachary Quinto and no doubt many others.

Here’s to a future, hopefully not too far away, where we all accept, love and honour each other because of our differences, not in spite of them.

Congratulations, Zach!

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In Loving Memory

Leonard Nimoy Tribute

Those of you who are regular viewers of the Emmy Awards probably know they host an “In Memorium” section every year, where the industry recognises the achievements and impact of those television stars who have taken their final voyage to Shakespeare’s Undiscovered Country.

This year “In Memorium” paid tribute to two bright Star Trek stars, the legendary Leonard Nimoy, and writer/producer Harve Bennett – the man often lauded as the saviour of the Star Trek movie series.

Harve Bennett and the crew of the Enterprise 1

TrekNews have a link to the tribute which you can watch here.  Leonard is featured at around the 3:20 mark.

Leonard Nimoy was, and for many always will be, Spock.  Though the actor originally bucked against that, he eventually came to accept it, and, like a lot of us, love Spock.

Leonard Nimoy

Leonard was born on the 26th of March 1931 in Boston Massachusetts, and passed away in February in Los Angeles.

As Spock, he touched millions of lives around the world – inspiring many of us and helping a lot of us feel less alone.  Spock was an underdog.  The only Vulcan in Starfleet, he was half Vulcan and half human and barely accepted by either.  He was torn between two worlds and two cultures and that difficult reality spoke to many people in the 1960’s, and continues to speak to millions today.  Spock was, and still is, a hero for anyone who has ever felt isolated and alone or in some way divided and confused.  Leonard injected so much subtle emotion and pathos into the original Spock that the character will live on for generations.

Leonard’s career was long and varied.  As the only Star Trek actor to appear in both the very first pilot (“The Cage” in 1964) and the second pilot (“Where No Man Has Gone Before” in 1966), as well as every episode of the original series, all six original series films (two of which he directed), Star Trek: The Next Generation, and the J.J. Abrams reboot (both 2009’s Star Trek and 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness), he was embraced by multiple generations – but he was more than Spock.  He was also an accomplished director, poet, author and photographer and acted in multiple other productions throughout the course of his life.

Since Leonard’s passing there have been many tributes to him, most of them quite beautiful.  Just Google his name and you’ll find a number of them online.

While the Emmy tribute is brief, as they are honouring many stars who have passed away, it’s always wonderful to see a person remembered by their peers.

Rest in peace, Leonard.  I still can’t believe you’re gone.

Harve Bennett and the crew of the Enterprise 2

Harve Bennett really did save the Star Trek film series.

While some fans love Star Trek: The Motion Picture (I’m one of them) and some rank it as their least favourite, it did meander a bit and the film failed to create any real sense of jeopardy for the crew of the Enterprise.  It did very well at the Box Office, but it was an expensive movie that many thought failed to capture the spirit of the original series.

Rather than abandon the potential of a film series, Paramount turned to Harve Bennett and gave Star Trek one more chance on the big screen.

Harve more than delivered.  He was the head of a creative team that produced what, for many fans, is still the absolute best Star Trek film of all time – Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Born on August 17 1930 in Chicago, Harve started his professional life in the US Army serving in the Military Police Corps.  After the army, he worked for CBS, then ABC where he became the Vice President of Daytime Programming.

He worked with Aaron Spelling, produced shows like the Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman and Rich Man, Poor Man.

When recruited to breathe new life into the Star Trek franchise he took to it with zeal.  As well as Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Harve Bennett went on to produce Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (which he also acted in).  But, he didn’t just produce, Harve wrote STIII:TSFS, co-wrote STIV:TVH and co-wrote the story for STV:TFF.

Harve Bennett Star Trek V

Though Harve finished his time with Star Trek after the less than successful Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, his positive impact on the franchise cannot be denied, and he is remembered fondly by the actors and fans of the series.

Harve passed away only a few days after Leonard on the 25th of February this year.

Thank you, Mr Bennett, for everything you did for Star Trek.

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