Episode 14 Review

Star Trek Discovery Recap and Review Banner Episode 14

With possibly one of the best and tensest openings since “The Best Of Both Worlds, Part II” or “The Year Of Hell, Part Two,” Star Trek: Discovery takes a deep breath before the upcoming season finale, but makes sure we don’t get too comfortable in this emotional and, once again, twisty episode.

The Facts
Episode Number: 114
Episode Title: “The War Without, The War Within” or “Cornwell Takes Charge”
Written By: Lisa Randolph
Directed By: David Solomon

Quotable
Saru: “Admiral!
Cornwell: “Where’s Captain Lorca?
Burnham: “Sarek… please!
Cornwell: “Stand down, specialist.  Now!”  Beat.  “Computer, initiate command level override.  Authorisation: Admiral Katrina Cornwell, pi beta six.
Computer: “Override confirmed.

Cornwell: “The Lorca I came up with was measured, he was reasoned.  I couldn’t have imagined…
Sarek: “That Lorca was an impostor from an alternate universe was not the most obvious conclusion.  We were all deceived.

Cornwell: “All evidence of your recent journey will be classified and destroyed.  We cannot risk the knowledge of this alternate universe leaving the confines of Discovery.”
Burnham: “I don’t understand?
Stamets: “There would be… too many possibilities.
Sarek: “Indeed.  Our people have suffered terrible losses.  What would you do if you thought that your dead wife, your lost child, your murdered parents might be alive on the other side and that the technology exists for you to see them again?  This knowledge must be buried.
Cornwell: “Command will want this locked down.
Saru: “Of course, Admiral.

Cornwell: “I want to be truthful with you.  Your side is winning.  When we met, you had nothing but contempt for the crumbling leadership of the Klingon Empire.
L’Rell: “T’Kuvma sought to strengthen and unify the Great Houses.  If he has succeeded in only this, it is cause for celebration.
Cornwell: “Your ‘Great Houses’ are carving up Federation assets among their factions.  A captured starbase bears the insignia of House D’Ghor, not of the Klingon Empire.  Is that the kind of ‘unity’ your messiah proclaimed.  They think nothing of the collateral damage caused by their brutal attacks.  They target civilians, hospitals, food conveys.  They slaughter innocents, and inspire terror across the quadrant.
L’Rell: “This is war, not a child’s game with rules.  We fight to preserve Klingon identity.
Cornwell: “No one is looking to destroy your culture!  Our laws are founded in equality, freedom.
L’Rell: “T’Kuvma taught us that the Federation cannot help itself.  It seeks universal homoginisation and assimilation.
Cornwell: “T’Kuvma was an ignorant fool, and your people are moving closer and closer to my home planet.  What are you looking for?  More territory?  Conditional surrender?  I mean, your people won’t even make demands.  Why?  How does this war end?
L’Rell: “It doesn’t.  Klingons have tasted your blood.  Conquer us, or we will never relent.
Cornwell: “Thank you.

Georgiou: “Your child is lost.
Sarek: “Do not confuse my ward with yours.
Georgiou: “My daughter was a singular example of brilliance until one foolish choice doomed her world.  Sound familiar?
Sarek: “If I understand correctly, my ward saw through the man who brought down not just your child, but your empire.  Perhaps best not to make comparisons.”  Beat.  “Why have you requested my presence?
Georgiou: “You were summoned, Vulcan, for one reason.  I want to help you end this war.

Sarek: “During my mind meld with Saru I learned of your attachment to the Klingon spy and what he did to you.  Such events are clearly troubling.
Michael: “I’m fine, Sarek.
Sarek: “I remain unconvinced.  There is irony here, of course, the man you fell in love with was a Klingon.
Michael: “He… I don’t know what he was.
Sarek: “There is also grace.  For what greater source for peace exists than our ability to love our enemy.
Michael: “I’ve made foolish choices.  Emotional choices.
Sarek: “Well, you are human.  As is your mother.  There is no telling what any one of us may do where the heart is concerned.  We are at war, logic dictates that each farewell may be our last.”  Beat.  “Do not regret loving someone, Michael.

Disco S1E14 Cornwell Brings Discovery Up To Speed

Moments of Interest
We know from Star Trek: Enterprise that mind meld’s are, in Vulcan years, still relatively new by the time we get to Star Trek: Discovery and Star Trek: The Original Series, but we also know, thanks to Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country and multiple TOS episodes, that they’re an intimate and private thing.  Forcing a mind meld on someone can be damaging for both the person undergoing the procedure, and the person initiating it.

In times of war and what sounds like the threat of extinction, it appears they also become a tool for quickly assessing a situation.

Sarek, at Cornwell’s behest, initiates an uninvited mind meld with Saru at the beginning of this episode.  It’s not something any of us would expect of Sarek, but I think it’s a device that’s being used by the writers to let every Star Trek fan know how desperate the Federation’s situation is it at this point in the war.

Another interesting moment is when Admiral Cornwell mentions Captain Jonathan Archer and the crew of the USS Enterprise NX-01 during the episode, reminding everyone that Archer’s trip to the Klingon Homeworld was the only time humans had set foot on that world.  Nice bit of continuity, and one I appreciated (being a Star Trek: Enterprise fan).

The Review
This episode is an acting tour de force for Jayne Brook and Michelle Yeoh in particular.  Both women are outstanding.  In every way.  They drive the plot forward, add remarkable nuance to every scene, and carry the episode effortlessly.

That’s not to say everyone else wasn’t good.  They were, as we’ve come to expect, and as per usual special mention needs to go to Sonequa Martin-Green, Mary Chieffo and Shazad Latif.  They shine in every scene and Mary Chieffo in particular is electric whenever she shares the screen with Jayne Brook.

For me, it’s all of these performances and the little moments that make the episode something special.

Some critics have said they’re not overly fond of “The War Within, The War Without,” and that the writers “dropped the ball” because the episode slowed the momentum of the last third of the season.  I couldn’t disagree more.  This episode was not only necessary as the inevitable prelude to the season finale, it was necessary for our characters as they start to process what has happened to them, and to process the fact that the war has gone terribly in their absence.  I guarantee you that if the writers hadn’t explored some of these issues before the end of the season, many critics would have be up in arms about that.

“The War Without, The War Within” allowed us to see where Tyler and Michael are at after the horrific shocks of a couple of episodes ago – and it’s not a good place.  It also allowed us to enjoy seeing L’Rell and Admiral Cornwell go at each other again, and it allowed us to see more of Emperor Georgiou.  For me, the real pleasure in the episode was watching Georgiou.  Michelle Yeoh was electric and menacing and she owned every scene she was in.  Seeing the character interact with Michael, Sarek and Cornwell left me thinking no one in the Prime Universe would ever stand a chance against her if she chose to act up.

Another highlight of the episode was seeing Katrina Cornwell in the Captain’s chair.  She looks good in it!  Hey, sometimes it’s the small things that make a fan happy.

Disco S1E14 Cornwell Takes Command

The episode began right where the last one ended, with Saru somewhat shocked by the appearance of the Mirror Georgiou in his transporter room.

Georgiou, for her part, is far from impressed an alien is giving orders and quips to Burnham that yesterday they were eating a Kelpian, and now Burnham is taking orders from one.

Yep.  That’s one way to leave an impression!

A not too happy Saru challenges Burnham on her lie (in an earlier episode she had told him she had not seen any Kelpiens in the Mirror Universe), but quickly pushes through that without, thankfully, bringing up the eating bit!

Saru tells Burnham that Tyler is doing well, and that Voq seems to be gone.  Michael tells Saru she’s not ready to see the spy.  And then shit gets serious as phaser wielding Andorians and Tellarites beam aboard, followed by Sarek and Admiral Katrina Cornwell.

It’s a tense, wonderful scene where Cornwell takes control, literally, and brings the Discovery under her command.

Disco S1E14 Sarek and Cornwell Beam Aboard

We quickly learn that the Federation hasn’t lost the war, as Saru initially thought at the end of the last episode, but they are getting smashed.

Cornwell advises certain members of the crew that 20% of Federation space has been lost, and the Klingons have – without rhyme or reason, as Michael points out – slaughtered hundreds of thousands of innocents.

As the episode progresses, the action quickly subsides (without ever completely losing the underlying threat of the defeat of the Federation) to focus instead on meaningful character moments, with one of the most intense being the briefest.  Stamets coming face to face with Ash.

It’s a scene that I’m not sure I’m happy with.  Stamets responded in a very Stamets way, and Ash certainly looked upset, even devastated, but it didn’t resonate with me.  It felt somehow hollow.  I didn’t want Stamets to bop Ash on the nose, but a quick scene of Paul rounding the corner and leaning against a bulkhead with a lone tear trailing down his cheek would have made the moment work.  Hugh and Paul’s relationship has been played up as this great love story, but we haven’t spent enough time seeing the effect on Stamets and I think we need to.  Anything less diminishes that love and Hugh’s time on Discovery.

The majority of the remainder of the episode deals with Georgiou and her manipulations.

Before we look at that though, there were two other important moments where enough time was given to the characters and their plight, that need to be mentioned.

The first is between Michael and Ash.  After initially refusing to see Tyler, at the prompting of Tilly she finally goes to him.

Disco S1E14 Michael Wants To Trust Georgiou

Things don’t start well, and lead Ash to a moment where he lashes out at Michael, pretty much telling Burnham that she got frightened and all of this is a convenient way for her to back out.  She doesn’t take that and fires back, reminding him he had his hands around her throat, and that she looked into the eyes of the man she loved to see nothing but hatred there and a desire to kill her.

That puts him in his place.

She very poignantly ends everything by telling him that his road to redemption, much like hers, will be a solo journey.

It’s a beautiful scene.  I’m constantly astounded by how much meaning Sonequa Martin-Green can squeeze into one sentence, even one word, through a simple change in tone, an unexpected inflection, or the quirk of her mouth.  Shazad Latif is similar.  While Sonequa’s delivery is always very controlled, as you would expect from someone who is playing a character who has been raised by Vulcan’s, Shazad’s delivery is very open with every emotion crossing his face.  What you would expect from someone who is essentially Klingon, a species not known for hiding their emotions.

The juxtaposition of the two is perfect.

The other meaningful moment didn’t play as well.

Before all of this, Ash visits the mess and everything goes quiet.  He grabs his meal and sits down alone while people whisper behind his back and cast him sidelong glances.

Disco S1E14 Tilly Brings Tyler Back Into The Fold

Tilly, echoing how she befriended Michael, moves from her table to sit with him.  He tells her she doesn’t have to, and she sets him straight.  Then Keyla Detmer joins them, offering Ash a warm “welcome back.”  The scene would have been perfect if it ended there, or with Lieutenant Bryce (the Communications Officer) joining them right after Detmer.  But, after Bryce, a whole bunch of people come over and it all seems a bit much.  It crossed from special to corny in seconds.  I want Ash to be forgiven, because we all know it was Voq who did all of those horrible things, but would so many people so easily welcome him back that quickly?  How has he redeemed himself?  He hasn’t?  Has he?  Has the crew had time to process what he did and grieve Doctor Culber’s death?  I don’t think so.  That moment, for me, felt forced and false.

And now, back to Georgiou.

Starfleet in the Prime Universe doesn’t have a chance.  If they don’t keep a close eye on her she’ll be ruling the Federation inside a decade.

There’s not much more I can say about Emperor Georgiou in this episode that I haven’t already.  She walks circles around every character.  While they innocently and naively (and a little warily) attempt to understand her, she is calculating in every moment and looking for an advantage or a way to manipulate things to her will.  And it’s constant.

Disco S1E14 The Emporer Is Unimpressed

Michelle Yeoh is not just a ‘moustache’ twirling villain in this episode, though.  She also shows compassion and even, dare I say, a smidge of love, to Burnham.  It’s fleeting, but it’s there.  Michelle conveys it all perfectly.  Complex characters are so rewarding for the viewer, and they show good writing, and this Georgiou is definitely complex.

Like most people in the western world, I fell in love with her watching Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.  Now I’ve fallen in love with her all over again, first because of her portrayal of Captain Georgiou, and now because of her portrayal of Emperor Georgiou.

I think the joy here is that Georgiou is now a character who has represented the very best of Starfleet, and now the absolute worst in the visage of her Mirror Universe self.

I love how the writers have done that!

Out of all of the interactions between Georgiou and those characters who know she is on board, the best is her private meeting with Sarek.

Disco S1E14 Michael, Cornwell, Georgiou and Sarek

The first time we see her interact with Sarek is after Michael confesses what she’s done.  Cornwell and Sarek go with Michael to visit the Emperor, and Sarek is surprised (as much as a Vulcan can be) by how alike this Georgiou is to his now dead friend.

That quick interaction, though, gives Georgiou an idea.  She picks up on the bond between Sarek and Michael and logs that in her memory for future use.

She sets about setting her trap.  The first step is helping Michael formulate a plan.  Michael shares that plan with Cornwell, who is excited.  Cornwell convinces what’s left of Starfleet’s leadership it will work.

The second step is taking the plan to the next level.  A dark and horrible level.  Georgiou “summons” Sarek and shares her complete idea with him.  It’s something she wouldn’t tell Michael because she didn’t think her “daughter who is not her daughter” could handle it.

During all of this we learn that Starbase One has been occupied by the Klingons (House D’Ghor to be exact) and that all of the Starfleet vessels and personnel are gone, presumed dead.  It’s an horrific moment for Admiral Cornwell, and Jayne Brook plays it oh so well.  I felt terrible for the character.  She obviously lost so many people that she cared for, and in that moment was probably thinking she would lose the Federation too.

It’s this last act by the Klingons, I think, that pushes Sarek to take his next step.

All of this leads to another big twist.  Yes, another twist, because apparently that’s what modern television is all about.

Sarek leaves the Discovery to make some “arrangements” and then, in the penultimate moment of the episode, we see what those arrangements are.

Emperor Georgiou becomes Captain Georgiou and is given command of the USS Discovery for a risky mission to Qo’noS.

She is introduced to the crew of the Discovery as the recently rescued Philippa Georgiou, much to the shock and joy of Keyla Detmer, and the shock and worry of Saru and Michael.

This twist actually took me by surprise.  Of all the things they could have done with the character, this one I did not expect – though it makes so much sense.

Disco S1E14 The Emporer Becomes A Captain

The look that Georgiou gives Michael just before the episode wraps should make us all worried, and it should petrify Burnham.  It’s obvious Philippa is playing them.

This episode works.

It’s not the fastest paced or most action packed, but it is character heavy and full of remarkable performances.

While some of the scenes don’t play out perfectly, the episode is strong and it deserves to be thought of favourably.

Predictions
I don’t know if I can even hope to work out what the producers’ plan is for this wonderful new Philippa Georgiou, but I’d like to think they will try and make this work.  It’s a brand new take on “the outsider” looking in and commenting on humanity.

Logic suggests Emperor Georgiou won’t live for long, but I hope, in this instance, the logical conclusion does not come to pass.

In other predictions, I firmly believe L’Rell is still up to something with Tyler and that he’s not as free of the Voq personality as we would like to believe.  The producers of Star Trek: Discovery seem to like avoiding happy endings!

Scorecard
Five Starfleet Deltas

An excellent episode, an important breather between the conclusion of one arc and what, we’ve been told, will be the conclusion of the war arc, and a nice episode for character development.

I can’t wait for the finale, which, if the previews are anything to go by, looks outstanding.

Bring on ass-kicking Emperor Georgiou!  I loved Captain Philippa Georgiou, but am really coming to adore this slightly twisted version of her.  Someone give Michelle Yeoh her own Star Trek spin-off.  Now!

LCARS Interface

Episode 12 Recap and Review

Star Trek Discovery Recap and Review Review Banner 3

A good episode with some outstanding moments, some unnecessary ones, and far too short a runtime.

If I was allowed to write only one sentence to describe this Star Trek: Discovery episode, that would be it.

Of those three comments, the one that irks me the most is the “too short” one.  There was a single exceptionally weak scene in this episode that could have been fixed by another two or three minutes of dialogue and action, and I don’t know why they didn’t give us more?  They certainly had time to because “Vaulting Ambition” is the shortest episode yet in live Trek history, coming in at only 37 minutes.  Prior to that, the shortest live Trek episode had been “Battle at the Binary Stars” which was 39 minutes long.

What’s going on guys? Did the editor get slash happy?

But, as per usual, I’m getting a bit ahead of myself.

The Facts
Episode Number: 112
Episode Title: “Vaulting Ambition” or “They Eat Kelpiens Here”
Written By: Jordan Nardino
Directed By: Hanelle Culpepper

Vaulting Ambition - The Empresses Court

Quotable
Lorca to Burnham
: “What are you afraid of?
Burnham: “Georgiou.
Lorca: “You mean Emperor Georgiou.
Burnham: “Logic tells me she’s not the woman that I betrayed.  But this feels like a reckoning.
Lorca: “Your Georgiou is dead.  She’s a ghost.
Burnham: “Haven’t you ever been afraid of a ghost?

Tilly to Saru, about Stamets: “I know it’s subjective, but he really does look better.  I mean, just look at his skin, it’s so dewy.

Stamets to Mirror Stamets: “Is this the afterlife?  Are you some sort of narcissistic Virgil leading me to judgement?
Mirror Stamets: “Yes, Paul.  You’ve been wrong about everything.  There is a God, and She’s very very mad at you right now.”  Beat.  Scoffs.  “I totally had you for a second there, you can’t deny it.  You should have seen your face!  I mean, our face.

Saru to the Doctor treating Toq (Tyler/Voq): “Burnham said he claimed to be a Klingon, but… how could that be possible?
Doctor: “His genome matches the one we have for Lieutenant Ash Tyler in our Starfleet database.  His brainwave patterns, however, are highly irregular.  Unless someone can tell me how they put a Klingon inside a Starfleet officers body, I don’t know how we can treat him?

Burnham to Georgiou: “I earned my command on the Shenzhou.
Georgiou: “You were hesitant to use it back at Harlak.  Those rebels could have escaped, I had to dispatch them myself.
Burnham: “I had it under control.
Georgiou: “You’ve grown soft.
Burnham: “And you’ve grown cruel.  If you missed me, then say it.  Otherwise let me be.

Georgiou to Burnham: “I do love you, Michael.  I would never grant anyone else in the Empire the mercy of a quick death.
Burnham: “You don’t love me.  You don’t love me because you don’t know me.  Before today, you and I have never met.  I am Michael Burnham, but I am not your Michael Burnham.  I’m from another universe…

Burnham to Georgiou: “Our bond, it seems, is strong enough to cross universes.

Saru to L’Rell:I do not know where your Voq ends and our Tyler begins, but they are both in jeopardy.

Stamets to Hugh: “Are you caught in the network too?
Hugh: “No.  I’m gone.
Stamets: “Gone?
Hugh: “You don’t know, do you?  Paul, I’m so sorry… but I died.

Georgiou to Burnham: “Your people are dangerous.”  Scoffs.  “The Federation.  I know it well from the Defiant‘s files.  There is a reason why they’re classified.  Equality.”  Scoffs.  “Freedom.  Cooperation.
Burnham: “Cornerstones for successful cultures.
Georgiou: “Delusions that Terrans shed millennium ago.  Destructive ideals that fuel rebellions, and I will not let you infect us again.

Vaulting Ambition

Moments of Interest
The guys added to canon in the subtlest, most appropriate way yet.  It was a nice moment and added a little something new to the now 50 year history (almost 51 year history) of the Mirror Universe (“Mirror, Mirror” aired in 1967, in the second season and will turn 51 in October of this year).

What did they do?  If you remember back an episode or two, Michael was narrating her personal log and commented on how different the light was in the Mirror Universe.  Light has played a big part in this series so far, with Lorca constantly reacting to bright light, and with the Discovery’s corridors and work spaces almost always shrouded in shadow.  In this episode, Georgiou reacts to an unexpected bright light and tells Michael that its one of the only real differences between her people and the people of our universe.

This addition to canon does not detract from or contradict anything that has gone before it, and gives more substance to this ‘reality.’

If you look back at Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Enterprise Mirror Universe episodes, all of them were visually darker in both tone and lighting when compared with normal episodes.  It makes sense, and it makes you smile.  It’s just a real nice touch.

The Recap and Review
“Vaulting Ambition” is, in many ways, the calm before the storm.  Despite the short length of the episode, a lot happened in it.  Possibly too much.  Let’s take a quick look at everything our favourite heroes and villains were subjected to:

  • Michael and Lorca head off to the ISS Charon on a shuttle.  She’s going to present him to the Emperor.  On the trip, they learn that the USS Defiant information they thought would save them, won’t.  Heaps of it has been redacted.  They hope they can find the unedited version on the Emperors big palace-ship.  As they get closer, Michael zaps Lorca with a pain inhibitor so he can better withstand the Agony Booth.

Vaulting Ambition - Off to See the Empress

  • Tilly and Saru are monitoring Stamets, and Tilly believes he’s getting better.  He’s still in a coma, but instruments show a lot is going on inside his mind.
  • Is it his mind?  We cut to Paul and Mirror Stamets somewhere in the glowy mycelial network.  That quickly changes to the shadowy corridors of the Discovery.  In this scene, we learn that something is wrong with the network.

Vaulting Ambition - The Mycelial Forest

  • We skip over to the Emperors unnecessarily huge, small-star-powered palace-ship.  Michael presents Lorca to the Emporer, who promises him a lifetime of pain.  While there, Georgiou asks Michael to choose a Kelpien from three who are standing off to the side.  Unsure of what’s going on, she picks one who looks like Saru, but isn’t Mirror Saru.  Mirror Saru is still on the Shenzhou, waiting to scrub Michael’s finger nails.  As Lorca is dragged away after a beat down by Georgiou, Burnham is invited to dinner and called “daughter” by the Emperor.

Vaulting Ambition - Georgiou and Burnham

  • We visit with Saru and Toq (Tyler/Voq) in Sickbay, where Toq is loosing his proverbial shit.  For one brief moment, Ash comes through, begging for help.
  • Over on the palace-ship, Lorca is thrown into an Agony Booth.
  • We don’t spend too much time with Lorca and his screams, and instead pay a visit to Georgiou and Burnham at dinner.  We and Michael quickly realise that the Kelpien she chose back in the throne room wasn’t so a slave could be set free.  That Kelpien was dinner.  Because that’s how evil these guys are. This scene nicely echoes something Saru said many episodes ago, about his species being like cattle.  When Michael finds out what she’s eating, she struggles heroically to not vomit.
    Was it just me, or did anyone else think Georgiou was going to push the chopsticks through the back of Burnham’s throat when she fed Michael the threat ganglia?
    Apart from the unpleasantness of eating another sentient species, dinner takes an even worse turn when Georgiou accuses Burnham of trying to usurp her and sentences her to death.
  • Then we’re back with Stamets and Stamets.  We discover that the mycelial network is taking over Mirror Stamets because he’s been in there too long.  We also get a glimpse of a familiar person… Hugh is haunting the corridors of the mycelial created Discovery.
  • We jump to the throne room where Michael reveals she and Lorca are from another universe.  She hands over Captain Philippa Georgiou’s Starfleet badge and encourages the Emperor to scan it.  Emperor Georgiou quickly discovers that Michael is telling the truth, and to stop any information from leaking kills everyone in her Council, except for a guy called Lord Eling, with an evil flying fidget-spinner.  He is sworn to say nothing, and granted governorship of Andor for his troubles.
  •  Back on Discovery, Saru is visiting L’Rell.  He tells her what is happening with Voq and asks for her help.  L’Rell channels her Bond-villain self and tells Saru what they did to both Ash Tyler and Voq:
    • The real Lieutenant Ash Tyler was captured at the Battle of the Binary Stars.
    • The Klingons harvested his DNA.
    • They reconstructed his consciousness.
    • They rebuilt his memory.
    • They modified Voq to make him appear human, inside and out.
    • They grafted Voq’s psyche onto Tylers.
    • Voq gave his body and soul to Klingon ideology.

Vaulting Ambition - L'Rell

  • L’Rell refuses to help, telling Saru that this is war.
  • We go back into the mycelial network where Paul finds Hugh.  In a heartbreaking moment, Hugh tells his love that he’s dead.
  • After the loveliness of Hugh and Stamets, we return to the Emperor and Michael.  Burnham begs the Emperor to help them, but she’s not interested.  In a really unwise move, Michael discloses the existence of the DASH drive and Georgiou wants it.
  • Next we visit with Saru and L’Rell.  He shows her images of Toq trying to rip his heart out of his chest.  L’Rell appears unmoved, so Saru beams Toq into her cell.  As Saru leaves her craddling Toq, she screams out to him that she can undo what has happened to him.
  • We skip back to the Agony Booth and Lorca screaming.  He’s being tortured by the brother of a woman Lorca used to be with and discarded, and the brother ain’t happy.
  • We don’t spend much time there before we go to the worst scene, possibly, of the entire series: L’Rell removing the Voq personality from the Ash Tyler personality.  So, she kills Voq, even though it’s his body, and leaves Ash.  We think. The scene is too short, there is no explanation for the Klingon brain wipe device, and her actions make no sense.
  • Back in the mycelial network, we’re with Paul and Hugh again as Hugh tries to help Paul come to terms with his death.  These scenes are beautiful, and just make me miss Hugh even more.  And I was already missing him a lot.  The big thing to happen in this scene was that Hugh snapped Paul out of his coma.
  • The next scene confused me a bit, and that’s probably what the producers wanted.  I’m not sure which Stamets is where? It looks like our Paul woke up on the ISS Charon.  The Mirror Stamets, I believe, woke up on the USS Discovery.  That Paul rushes with Tilly to the cargo bay that holds the spores… to find they are dying.

Vaulting Ambition - Empresses Starship Palace

  • On the Charon, Georgiou insists Burnham bring the Discovery to her, and Burnham complies.  Saru is a little doubtful, but she convinces him it’s the only way.
  • We do a series of quick inter-cuts between Lorca and his torturer going at each other, and Georgiou and Burnham sort of facing off.
  • In one of these quick mini-scenes, Georgiou reacts to some bright light.  This shocks Michael as she realises Lorca has been lying all along.  He’s really from the Mirror Universe.  He was also Georgiou’s lover. To put the boot in, Georgiou pretty much says that Lorca groomed Burnham.  He feigned affection for her as a fatherly figure, then seduced her, turning her into his lover, all for the Terran throne.
  • We wrap everything up with Lorca over-coming his torturer and telling him that he liked the guys sister, but found someone better.  He then stomps the guy’s head in and we cut to black.

Vaulting Ambition - Lorca is Not a Nice Man

Like I said, a lot happened in this episode, and some of the plot points didn’t get the time they deserved and actually needed.

The big take aways: Paul is back, finally.  Lorca is from the Mirror Universe, which many of us had expected.  The Mirror Universe guys are so evil they eat Kelpiens.  Ash might be back, but he’s now Klingon body Ash.

Yes, I know that last one is a confusing sentence.

I enjoyed this episode, but one thing really annoyed me.  The scene where L’Rell removes the Voq consciousness.

First, where did she get the device that enabled her to do that?
Second, why would she essentially kill Voq?  And it appears that’s what she’s done.  She even gives the Klingon death roar to announce Voq’s arrival in Sto’Vo’Kor.  She loved him.  Why not erase Ash?

Those two issues above could have been resolved with a few simple words… “Voq would not want to live in this weak body…” or “The Tyler personality was too strong.  Voq was weakened by the surgery and now he has been usurped.”  Something like that.  It would have also made more sense if the device she had used to eradicate Voq’s consciousness looked like it had been jury-rigged out of Federation medical tools.  You wouldn’t have needed to explain that, because it would be obvious.  Now it just looks like she was carrying the personality-wiping device around in her space purse, and all Saru had to do was get someone to go fetch it from wherever they keep prisoners’ belongings.

With a 37 minute run time, they could have fixed that.

The brevity of the episode and these plot issues are why this episode doesn’t get a five.  The Mirror Universe episodes have been wonderful, but this one lets the season down by not using everything at its disposal to tell its part of the story.

The dialogue was great, the direction was great, everything worked – the episode just comes off as lazy and unnecessary in places because of the lack of explanation (shown, not told – not exposition) and time given to scenes that didn’t need to be there.  Speaking of which.  Eating Kelpiens.  Did we need to go there?

Burnham’s psyche is screwed up enough.  She lost her parents as a child.  She discovered her adoptive father lied to her, making her feel second class for no reason for at least seven years of her adult life.  She betrayed someone she loved in an attempt to stop a war from starting.  She lost an mother-figure because of her actions, and many other people she cared for.  She lost her rank and position in Starfleet, and was sentenced to life imprisonment.  She’s been isolated and hated ever since.  Now she’s eaten a sentient being, a sentient being that reminds her very much of someone she cares for and feels like she also betrayed.  How will she face Saru after this?

I don’t think that scene was necessary.  With the evil flying fidget spinners, Agony Booths and ruthless bombardment of planets, we already know the Terran Empire is ruthless and evil.  Eating a Kelpien added nothing to this but fucked-up-ness.

There is something some fans are taking exception to, though it doesn’t bother me too much.  It unsettles me, but I get.  It’s the “Lorca is a dirty old man” thing.

I think it’s in keeping with his character.  He will do anything to achieve his desired goals.  While it’s not insinuated he had an intimate relationship with Michael when she was young, it is distasteful that he even went there when she was older – especially after being a father figure.  Lorca has done heinous things throughout the run of the show, so this isn’t so shocking to me.  I’m better able to accept his manipulations than I am the magic brain wiping device, or feasting on Kelpien, because the groundwork has been laid for that reveal.

The one question that remains with Lorca is… does he love Michael?  We’ve seen his over protectiveness in almost every episode.  Was it because of love, or was it need?  Did he keep her safe because he knew that through her he could get the crown, and kill the Emperor, and was that the only reason he worried after her?

This episode raised one or two new questions for us, while revealing a twist or two and confirming at least one more fan theory, but it didn’t do much more.  It was good, but it could have been better.

Something the writers might want to remember as they prep Season Two: We the fans have been two steps ahead of you this entire time. We picked Lorca and Ash back in episodes three, four and five and have been patiently waiting. We love Star Trek. We don’t love Star Trek like a Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead fan loves their show. We love it like a football or baseball fan loves their sports. Like a sports fan knows the batting averages for a particular team back through the ages, we know Star Trek just as intimately. We’re intelligent. We’re educated. We’re passionate and we are devoted. As this series has shown you, we will get behind you if you treat us with respect, which you have. You do, however, have to work a little harder if you want to surprise us because we will dissect every frame and obsess over it if we need to. You guys have done an incredible job, but I think you’ve underestimated us a bit. This isn’t a challenge, twists for the sake of a twist are dull and disappointing so we don’t need them, but to your credit you did keep us guessing and wondering “are we right?” and we have loved it.

I really prefer this long story form version of Star Trek.

Thank you for what has been, so far, an exceptional first season of my favourite television series.

Predictions
At least one of my predictions was proven right with this episode, the Captain Lorca we know has been the Mirror Universe Lorca all along.  A few online reviewers have thought this for a long time, and with our suspicions now proven right what’s left to speculate on?  For me, it’s Lorca’s longevity.  As brilliant an actor as Jason Isaacs is, and as compelling and intriguing a character as Garbriel Lorca is, I still don’t think Lorca is making it out of Season One alive.  That’s prediction one.

Prediction 2?  Lorca and Burnham will have it out in a big fight next episode.

Prediction 3?  Lorca and Empress Georgiou will die at each others hands in an insane battle to the death.

Prediction 4?  I think Mirror Stamets is working with Lorca, and is part of the rebellion to unseat Emperor Georgiou.  I think he engineered Lorca’s escape to our universe.

Any more?  Yep.

Hugh has been “consumed” by the mycelial network and will only appear to Stamets when he’s hooked into it.  The supposed death of the mycelial network, as commented on by Mirror Stamets this episode, will impact significantly on Stamets’ loss because if the forest dies, he won’t get to see Hugh again.

They will leave the Mirror Universe at the end of Episode 13.

Episodes 14 and 15 will wrap up the Klingon war, and signal a few things for the coming season which I think will still be all about redemption, but also new beginnings.  New beginnings for the Federation post war.  New beginnings for Michael, who Starfleet has to think differently of now.  New beginnings for Ash.  New beginnings for L’Rell.  Perhaps even a new beginning for the Klingon Empire.  Most importantly, a new beginning and a new mission for the Discovery.

Scorecard
4 Deltas

Next week’s episode is called “What’s Past is Prologue.”

Star Trek: Discovery airs in the United States on CBS All Access, with new episodes becoming available on Sundays at 8:30pm ET.  In Canada, the show airs on the Space Channel at 8:00pm ET, also on a Sunday.  Outside of the US and Canada, Star Trek: Discovery airs on Netflix on a Monday at 8:00am in the UK and at 7pm in Australia.

See you next week for another review.

Live long, and prosper.

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Episode 10 Recap and Review

Despite Yourself

Well.  Holy crap.  That was one intense episode.

It should be obvious by now that these recaps are full of spoilers, but just to be on the safe side… be warned, there are some major spoilers ahead!

If you haven’t seen Star Trek: Discovery Episode 10 “Despite Yourself” and want to remain unspoiled, do not read on.  You’ll regret it.  Really big stuff happens in this episode.

First things first:

The Facts
Episode Number: 110
Episode Title: “Despite Yourself”
Written By: Sean Cochran
Directed By: Jonathan Frakes

Quotable
Michael to Tilly, Lorca, Saru and Ash: The Terrans appear to be the antithesis of us in every way.  They’re an oppressive, racist, xenophobic culture that dominates all known space.  And they’re ruled by a faceless Emperor.”

Lorca to Michael, Tilly, Saru and Ash:No way we’re asking these neighbours for a cup of sugar.

Tilly to everyone, at one major reveal in the episode:Tha… ah… that’s me.  That’s me!
Lorca in response:That’s absurd.

Lorca to Tilly:You just get rid of them as fast as possible, and you talk as little as possible.
Tilly to Lorca:That’s ah… that might be a little hard.  Have you noticed that I talk a lot?
Lorca in response:Defy your every instinct.

Tilly to the USS Cooper:Hello, this is Captain Tilly.  What the heck?  Heck?  Hell… what the Hell?  Hold your horses!

Michael to Tilly and Saru as she reads off Captain Tilly’s nicknames:And finally…
Saru, reading over Michael’s shoulder:Captain ‘Killy’?  Well that’s not very clever.

Burnham to Lorca:Destiny didn’t get me out of prison, captain.  You did that.

Burnham to Tilly: “…You have the strength of an entire crew that believes in you.  Fortify yourself with our faith in you.  That’s what a real captain does.

Tilly as Captain Tilly, to Captain Danby Connor: “The only pleasure I take is from the blood of my enemies staining my uniform.

Tilly as Captain Tilly, to Captain Danby Connor:If you greeted me that way, Connor, I’d cut your out tongue and use it to lick my boots!

If you hadn’t noticed, Tilly gets all of the best lines this episode.

And now… RED ALERT!

Spoiler Alert

Interesting Bits and Pieces
– For the first time, Saru’s threat ganglia respond to Ash Tyler.
– The Agony Booths we see on the Shenzhou look like a natural evolution of the ones we saw on Star Trek: Enterprise.
– It looks like the starbase they were meant to be jumping to is in orbit of a famous Star Trek planet, Organia!

The Recap and Review
After a quick look back at the season so far, we pick up right where Episode 9 concluded with an intense, emotional, sometimes funny and at times tongue-in-cheek episode.

In case the events of last episode are a little fuzzy in your head after the two-month hiatus, at the end of Episode 9 Lorca meddled with the spore jump coordinates, things went bad for Paul in the reaction chamber, and the USS Discovery found itself lost after an “incomplete” jump.

We're Not In Kansas Anymore

As the crew try to figure out why they’re where they wanted to be after the jump from Pahvo, but nothing else is, Vulcan rebels appear and attack the ship!  Taken by surprise, they’re rescued by the starship Cooper.  We quickly learn something is up thanks to a testosterone laden message from the captain of that vessel.  We also learn that Stamets is stable but unresponsive and the spore-drive is down, stranding the Discovery.

It’s then that Saru discovers that the quantum signatures of that ship and the Vulcan vessel are off.

That’s not possible,” Burnham says.  “All matter native to our universe resonates with the same quantum signature.  Nothing can change it.

Saru agrees with her as Lorca quickly states the (to us) obvious: “Unless… this is not our universe.”  And we jump to the opening credits.

We rejoin Lorca, Burnham and Saru in Lorca’s Ready Room where Lorca shows them the same map he revealed to Stamets last episode to convince him to make the 133 jumps.

The Mycelial Network

Meanwhile, in Sickbay, Paul has regained consciousness.  He still has his Gary Mitchellesque eyes, and is talking to himself about a ‘palace’ as Tilly tries to “annoy” him into being a little more coherent.

Culber gently tells her that Paul is in a state of neurological-dysregulation, the like of which he’s never seen.

Paul gets up and as Hugh tries to get him back into bed, he mumbles about the palace again and throws Doctor Culber across the room.

Lorca comes in soon after and Tilly takes that as her cue to leave, and Hugh very calmly and very directly tells Lorca off, asking him if he’d planned all of this?

Is Hugh the smartest and most perceptive person on the ship?

Lorca takes Hugh off Paul’s case, much to Hugh’s annoyance, and leaves.

Culber and Lorca

We cut to Ash in a cool little pod thing with arms and he’s trying to extract a data core from one of the wrecked ships.

Now is probably a good time for a little diversion.

Some die-hard Star Trek fans have taken exception to the modernising of vessels and equipment in Star Trek: Discovery.  Some of it I agree with, like the rampant use of holograms and, though I love the new uniforms, I am still a little bewildered by just how different they are.  But, some I don’t agree with.

The creatives behind this series had to update everything otherwise Star Trek would lose all relevance and be nothing more than a homage to a very old television show that was great for its time, but not so much so now.  In 1966 Star Trek was cutting edge. In 2017/2018 it isn’t. That doesn’t mean we dismiss it, but as reasonable human beings it does mean we make some understandable allowances.

To make Star Trek: Discovery more than just a quaint homage, the team had to push everything up a notch.  On The Expanse we have people using their mobile/cell like communications devices for everything – they’re projecting 3-D images from the devices that they can manipulate with their fingers, and they have worker pods that are a step or two up from what we see in the first few Star Trek movies.  We have similar technological advances in Killjoys, Supergirl, the sadly now cancelled Dark Matter and more.

Star Trek: Discovery had to push further, because as much as Star Trek is known for it’s philosophy, excellent characters, ethical approach to everything, inclusion, positive future, and challenging story lines, it’s also known for its future-forward technology.  It set the bar and inspired generations.

This pod that Tyler is flying, is, like many other ‘leaps’ on Star Trek: Discovery, a necessity, and is in keeping with the original series’ ability to imagine the future by extrapolating on the present.  We’re so far beyond what Gene Roddenberry and most everyone else involved with that first Star Trek could have dreamed of in their present, that it is so very right the new people shepherding this series forward, be equally as future focused.

We’ll always have the original series, and many of us will continue to love it, but Star Trek won’t exist for our children and their children, if we don’t adapt it for today.  I, personally, would not want to take that away from future generations.  Star Trek is more important than that.  Very few, if any, millennials, are going to be interested in checking out the original series.  That’s sad, but most likely true. For a generation or two more, the first few films might still hold their attention, but that too will eventually fade because we’re living in the future now and we’re already using devices that appear far more powerful than the communicators and PADDs of Trek’s yesterday.

Enough of my sermon.  I feel passionate about this, because Star Trek has shaped my life.  I want it to help shape the lives of the children of today and tomorrow, because it’s one of the few things we have left that teaches compassion, inclusion and hope.  We need Star Trek more than we ever have.

Back to Tyler and his cool little worker pod.

As he glides between the debris toward his destination he starts to hallucinate, and we see a little more of his torture (?) at the hands of L’Rell.

As the bridge crew watch his pod wobble around, confused by his sudden inability to fly stuff, he snaps out of it and successfully retrieves the data core.

As with everything Star Trek: Discovery does, the entire sequence is slick and looks beautiful.  It’s also carefully and thoughtfully directed by Jonathan Frakes, who uses a series of angles and cuts to show us the intensity of Ash’s experience.

Back on Discovery, Ash confronts L’Rell and this is where things get very interesting.

L'Rell Triggers Ash

As Ash asks L’Rell to tell him what she did to him, she suggests he opens the cell… and he does!  WTF Chief Security Officer?!

Mary Chieffo, throughout her time on the show, has shown she is an incredible actor, but in this simple scene she blows all of her other performances out of the water. It’s subtle and pitch perfect.

How any actor, under that much makeup and that many prosthetics, can convey the seductiveness and complicated emotions of the character in that moment is beyond me.  Why haven’t we heard of this incredible young woman before now?  She may be one of the most under rated actors around.

As she seduces Tyler, he grabs her by the throat.  Her response?  She utters the first few words of T’Kuvma’s prayer: “Who do we seek?

Suddenly Ash is not Ash anymore.  In a perfect copy of Voq’s voice, Ash recites the prayer with her.

Then he snaps out of it.  Much to L’Rell’s shock.  It’s clear she didn’t expect that.

You have another name.  Say it.”  She encourages him.

I know what my name is!” he screams back as he brings his phaser to bear on her.  Looking a little unhinged, he continues with: “If you don’t tell me what you did to my mind, to my soul, I’m going to make you scream it as you die.

The prayer should make you remember, something is wrong!” L’Rell says, sounding surprised, confused and perhaps even a little frightened.

You’re damn right something’s wrong,” he yells.  “Now tell me!

He shakes himself out of it and runs from the Brig as L’Rell affirms to herself that he will return to her.

So, Tyler is Voq.  Now we just need to know one of two things: has he been surgically altered with Ash’s memory engrams layered over the top of his original personality?  Or, has Ash had Voq’s memory engrams layered over his personality and all the torture flashbacks are just that.  Flashbacks?

Starcrossed Lovers

We visit with Ash and Michael for a brief, intimate moment, as Ash tells her that his flashbacks are worse and asks for her help to get through it all.

She suggests he come clean about his PTSD but he begs her to let him handle things his own way.  For now.

She tells him she’ll trust him, and is called away to engineering.  We linger on Ash for a few seconds as he shatters a glass in his hand.  That boy ain’t controlling shit!

In engineering, Tilly shows Michael the now open data core.  They work out they can read it and Michael gets to work.

Next scene, Michael informs Saru, Tilly, Ash and Lorca that they are indeed in a new universe, one where a Terran Empire, not a United Federation, is the greatest power and one where a bunch of non-human species have entered into a rebellion against the Terrans.

They’re all called to the bridge because the Cooper has come back.

As they prepare to respond to the Cooper (because if they don’t, it’s threatening to blow the crap out of them), they learn that the Terran Universe Discovery is most likely now in their universe.

And here, we finally have a Star Trek character refer to the Mirror Universe as the Mirror Universe, as Burnham tells Lorca he can’t respond to the Cooper because he’s not the captain of the “Mirror Discovery.”

Tilly is.

Captain Killy

This is where the fun begins!

Up to this point the episode has been deadly serious.  It maintains its air of intrigue and tension, but from here on in merges it with a taste of the camp and wild abandon we’re all familiar with from the Mirror Universe.

Lorca guides Tilly into the Captains chair and gives her a few handy tips.  She is obviously terrified.

Then, in a scene that shows the brilliant comedy timing of both Mary Wiseman and Jason Isaacs, we’re treated to one of the most unique greetings between starships ever, and what may have been an homage to James Doohan and Scotty with Lorca assuming a Scottish bur.

I laughed out loud at Tilly’s greeting, and I admit my hands went to my face in both shock and amusement because I both felt terrible for her and was just plain delighted by every word she said and every facial expression she conveyed.

Kudos to the casting directors of Star Trek: Discovery.  Did they know how amazing these guys would be in EVERY single episode?  I swear this is the best ensemble cast on television anywhere – and I just came off holidays where I binge watched more television series than is probably healthy.

After they deal with the Cooper, Lorca instructs Saru to get everyone ready – especially Tilly.

We’re treated to a fun montage as they prep Tilly and the Discovery and her crew to pass unnoticed in this strange universe.

Star Trek: Discovery looks cinematic every episode.  It’s production values are outstanding, and everything about the show is beautiful.  This episode it took another step up because it was being directed by someone very familiar with directing major motion pictures.  If “Despite Yourself” has a fault, it’s that too much was packed into its run time, but despite that, Jonathan makes it flow and everything he does is just right.  His direction is dramatic when it needs to be, increasing tension and making the stakes feel high, and he flawlessly meshes in the camp and corn when needed using wonderful devices to transition certain scenes.

Commander Riker Gives the New Guys Some Tips

So how does this version of the Mirror Universe hold up to those seen on Star Trek: Enterprise, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: The Original Series?

Really, really well.

In fact, it looks how it should.  Rather than just a belt and a cut off uniform to show more mid-rift, they give the uniforms a wonderful makeover with leather and gold plating, and update the Terran Empire logo just enough to make it look gaudily magnificent but still like the symbol we’re used to.

There’s a whole slew of badges and medals and the agony booths look perfect and, I was pleasantly surprised to see, very much like the prototype we saw in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “In a Mirror, Darkly.”

Back in Lorca’s Ready Room, we learn that Michael was the Captain of the Shenzhou and is presumed dead, and that Lorca is a fugitive wanted for her murder.  Lorca was the Captain of the Buran in this reality also, but lost his crew in an attempted coup against the Emperor.

Lorca asks about the Emperor, but Michael tells him the Emperor is shadowed in mystery.

For those of you who have seen Star Trek: Enterprise, you may remember that Hoshi Sato took over the USS Defiant at the end of “In a Mirror, Darkly,” and laid waste to her enemies using it’s advanced technology and became Empress.  Interestingly, in one of the teaser images from episode 11, it looks like the ‘Emperor’ arrives, and is most definitely an Empress – though we don’t see her face.

The Empress of the Terran Empire

You have no idea how happy I will be if it was Hoshi!  She’d be pretty old, close to 130, but humans in Star Trek are long lived. I’d love to see Linda Park back on Trek, but I admit it is unlikely.  I would, however, settle for Hoshi being mentioned.

We cut to a scene where Lorca talks about the USS Destiny.  Data from the rebels lets the Discovery team know that the Destiny arrived in the Mirror Universe sans spore-drive, but it doesn’t give any specifics.  That data is only available to command level officers.  Lorca and Burnham have hatched a plan, however.  They will lure the Shenzhou to their location, and Lorca, Burnham and Ash will beam over with Ash serving as Michael’s personal guard.  Lorca will be her prisoner.  Michael will try and obtain the information they’re after because that will be their ticket to getting home.

Saru is not happy, but Lorca is insistent.

During this scene we get a look at a wireframe graphic of the USS Defiant.  In shape, she is very similar to the Constitution Class vessels we’ve come to know and love over the years.

USS Defiant Wireframe Image

There have been changes – the saucer has some alterations to it and the warp nacelles have been “enhanced.”  It’s hard to tell if the unusual blocky bulge on the main drive is an addition, or part of the other nacelle.  It will be interesting to see if we actually get to experience the ship on screen as something other than a graphic.

Next we visit with Culber and Ash in Sickbay.  Ash is concerned.  His flashbacks are getting worse and he’s worried.  He wants Culber to do a more detailed examination of him.

Ash is a little volatile but seemingly rational.  Culber starts the deeper scans as Paul shouts out from a nearby bed “Stay out of the palace!

As Culber goes over to soothe his beloved, Paul’s eyes revert to normal and he seems coherant for a moment.  He looks at Hugh and says: “Be careful.  The enemy is here.

This spooks the good doctor.

We jump to Tilly and Michael getting ready for their new roles as Mirror versions of themselves.

Tilly, as per usual, is adorable.

Lorca walks in on both women and seems strangely comfortable and even slightly too knowledgeable about how people act in the Mirror Universe.

I’m still a little on the side of “this is Mirror Universe Lorca,” but admit to not being entirely convinced.  It feels like the Mirror Universe is a huge part of this new Star Trek, but I know we’ll have to wait and see.

Tilly

Lorca, Tilly and Michael go the bridge where Tilly starts snapping out orders, getting herself into character so she can successfully play this harsher, crueller version of herself.  She orders her crew to hail the ISS Shenzhou and we get to see Ensign Danby Connor again – only he’s not an Ensign anymore.  He’s now Captain of the Shenzhou.

Secluded in Lorca’s Ready Room, Burnham is shocked to see Connor.

As Tilly sets up Burnham’s return, Lorca smashes his face into the door to bloody himself up and they enter the bridge.

Connor doesn’t seem too happy to see ‘Captain’ Burnham back.

She pushes Lorca ahead of her and makes him kneel as they further elaborate on their story, telling Connor she faked her death so she could hunt Lorca down.

Despite Yourself

After some snappy reparte between Captain “Killy,” Connor and Burnham, the Shenzhou heads their way.

After the above unfolds, Ash returns to Sickbay for an update from Doctor Culber.  As some of you may remember, I mentioned how he was becoming a favourite character of mine a few reviews ago.  In this episode, he gets a lot of screen time.  Which was wonderful, until this now infamous scene.

Hugh questions Ash about some skeletal and neurological issues he’s found, and Ash can’t recollect anything along those lines having happened to him in the past.  Hugh pushes a little more, talking about the massive scarring to his organs and suggesting there has been a personality “overlay”, and before we know it our beloved Doctor is dead.

With L’Rell’s voice echoing in his head, Ash has snapped Doctor Culber’s neck.

It’s one of the more shocking scenes to ever appear in a Star Trek episode, because it’s entirely unexpected.  You start to sense that Hugh is in danger, but your head doesn’t go straight to the “he’d dead, Jim” thought.  Then… he’s dead, Jim, and you’re left stunned.

Culber’s death created something of a furour.  One of the first openly gay characters in Star Trek, in a meaningful relationship with another crew member, and a gay man of colour as well… lots of accidentally wrong messages being sent there.

It became such a thing – and the writers knew it would be a ‘thing’, so much so they talked to GLAAD about it – then on After Trek they pretty much told us that Culber wasn’t quite dead.  We were told to look into the real Paul Stamets’ work on the mycelial network for some clues about what is to come.

From this shocking moment, we start the wrap up of the episode – and it happens fast.

Captain Burnham and her Bodyguard, Ash

Michael, Lorca and Ash beam to the Shenzhou.

It doesn’t go according to plan.  Lorca gets thrown into an Agony Booth, Connor shows Michael how unhappy he is about her being alive and tries to rectify that by attacking her in the turbo life.

In one of the best staged Star Trek fights ever, Michael is forced to kill Connor, and we’re left wondering if any Danby Connor in any universe anywhere is allowed to live past his early to mid-twenties?

Burnham Faces Off Against Connor

It was great to see Sam Vartholomeos again, and just as sad to see his character wiped off the face of existence.  Again.

“Despite Yourself” ends with Michael sitting in the Captain’s chair of the ISS Shenzhou. It’s quite forbidding and begs the question, just how long will they be there?

This episode is wonderful.  As I said earlier, it’s only real fault is in how much it tries to pack in to less than an hour of viewing.  Somehow, with all of these plot points, and the differing yet complementary tonal shifts, Jonathan Frakes weaves it all together beautifully.

Every performance is excellent, every effect spot on, every music cue perfect, every camera angle carefully thought out and evocative.

It’s the best episode to date (despite Hugh’s death).

Predictions
This is a terrible prediction, because the producers have all but told us Culber isn’t dead.  So, I predict Paul has some special spore-driven power that brings his beloved back.

Ash, if the above prediction is correct, is found out and we start to finally deal with the complexities of this character, and the actual PTSD someone would have whether they were the survivor of Klingon torture or were a Klingon who had been through what Voq has apparently been through.

The Empress of the Terran Empire is Philippa Georgiou (if the ruler in actually female).

The Discovery goes head to head with the Defiant.

Our Lorca is the Mirror Universe Lorca, and the Prime Universe Lorca is a homocidal maniac.

Captain “Killy” gets more awesome lines in Episode 11!

We see a goatee.

Scorecard
Five Starfleet Deltas

The next episode of Star Trek: Discovery airs tonight in Australia, and should have just aired in the US and UK.  It’s called “The Wolf Inside.”

Star Trek: Discovery airs in the United States on CBS All Access, with new episodes appearing on Sundays at 8:30pm ET.  In Canada, the show airs on the Space Channel at 8:00pm ET, also on Sundays.  Outside of the US and Canada, Star Trek: Discovery airs on Netflix on a Monday.  8:00am BST in the United Kingdom, and usually at 6:00pm AEDT in Australia, but last week the episode dropped at 7:00pm so it might arrive later than usual again.

See you in a few days for another review.

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A Brave New Adventure

Star Trek Discovery Premiere Eve Banner

We’ve been a little quiet here at Star Trek: Sentinel because there has been so much Star Trek: Discovery news coming out that we kind of just wanted to enjoy it and let it wash over us, and didn’t feel the need to comment on it.

Now we stand on the eve of the launch of a brand new series and a bold new experiment in Star Trek.

Since the new series was first announced and up until today, we’ve all seen people expressing hope and excitement for the show and people nit-picking everything and heaping disdain on this new series every Trek fan should be looking forward to.

Georgiou and Burnham

It’s probably no secret that I am incredibly excited about the show.  I love Sonequa Martin-Green as an actor, I’m a huge fan of Kirsten Beyer, Akiva Goldsman and many other behind the scenes creatives, and I admire the risks everyone has taken to make this version of Star Trek relevant.

I’ve been disappointed, even upset by some of the negative coverage coming from some sites.  The amount of it coming from one particular sci-fi site (not a Trek one) has caused me to delete it from my favourites and move on.

Now that we’re literally only hours away from the first brand new episode of Star Trek television in 12 years, I thought it might be a good idea to point you guys toward a handful of excellent articles out there right now on websites staffed by professionals who are genuinely excited to see Star Trek: Discovery.

There are two sites in particular that have had extensive and exceptional coverage over these last few weeks:

TrekMovie and TrekCore.

TrekMovie, in particular has suddenly become one of the best, if not the best, Trek site ever.  Their coverage of Star Trek: Discovery has been spectacular.

TrekCore have always been amazing, and though they may be following a close second behind TrekMovie, their coverage has still been excellent.

Inside the Discovery

Here are some great articles from both sites.

Let’s start with the coverage of the recent Premiere, held a couple of days ago in Los Angeles – attended by many of the cast and crew of Star Trek: Discovery, and Star Trek royalty, Nichelle Nichols and William Shatner.

Nichelle, Sonequa and Bill

Sonequa and the cast get a blessing from one of the most significant women in modern science fiction, Nichelle Nichols.

TrekMovie gives us some photos from the Hollywood Premiere.

TrekCore‘s coverage of the Premiere.

For more on the “blue carpet” premiere event, visit both TrekMovie and TrekCore and look through their most recent articles.

Of particular interest to fans, the Season One Press Kit for Star Trek: Discovery has finally been released.

It’s beautiful.  The images above, and one a little earlier on in this article are from that kit.

TrekCore got the scoop on this one, so go check out their article focusing on the kit here.

Some of the things we’ve learned over the last few weeks are that the Klingon War with the Federation will play a major part in Season One of Star Trek: Discovery.

We’ve also learned that the war story will be wrapped up by the end of the 15 episode first season arc.

We don’t know what Season Two might hold, but it’s interesting that the Klingon conflict will fade out to be replaced by something else.

I think that’s a good idea.  Multiple years focusing on a war might get a bit a much – plus, there’s a lot more to Star Trek than Klingons and the war-arc has already been done and done well in Trek’s illustrious history.

Star Trek Discovery EW Photoshoot 1

If you want to catch up with all of the Star Trek: Discovery news, visit those two wonderful sites.

Right now, I am eagerly counting down the hours to Star Trek: Discovery‘s release on Netflix.

If I could have one wish over these next few days, it would be for my fellow Trek fans to give this show a chance.

A great deal of incredible talent has been brought together to bring this show to us, and a lot of love and care has gone into it.  Yes, it looks different to Star Trek: The Original Series and probably shares more in common with Star Trek: Enterprise and the J.J. Abrams Trek movies, but that’s superficial and necessary if we want to attract new viewers and keep Stat Trek alive.  The show and it’s producers are doing everything they can to be faithful to canon and to make us something we will love.

The internet has become an horrifically nasty place where people seem to think it’s acceptable, even ‘cool’ and funny, to be negative and sometimes even abusive, but Star Trek fans are better than that, and the worst of us are nothing more than a vocal minority.

I hope other fans who love all things Trek for everything that the shows stand for, and respect and attempt to live the ideals of Star Trek, embrace this new show and love it and ensure it continues for many years to come.

We’ll be back in a couple of days with a review of the pilot episode, which is titled “The Vulcan Hello.”

Until then, may we all and may Star Trek: Discovery especially, live long and prosper.

In the United States, Star Trek: Discovery premieres on CBS on the 24th of September with all subsequent episodes airing on CBS All Access.  In Canada Star Trek: Discovery will premiere on the 24th of September also, on Bell Media’s CTV and the Space Channel.  For the rest of us, Star Trek: Discovery will launch on Netflix on Monday the 25th of September.

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Lorca and Burnham

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One of the biggest questions to pop up after the most recent Star Trek: Discovery trailer was… where was Captain Lorca?

It seems he was a special surprise being kept for Entertainment Weekly, who have an article on the new series coming out in their next issue.

But before we get to that…

Yesterday, the star of Discovery spoke about something a lot of us have been contemplating since the release of the trailer – what is Lieutenant Commander Burnham’s relationship with Vulcan?  And, in particular, Sarek.

Sonequa shared some information on her character’s arc with Entertainment Weekly:

I have an inner war and it’s a journey of self discovery and finding out what it means to be alive, to be human, to be a Starfleet officer, what it means to be a hero.

Yes.  The character is human.  Many of us wondered if she might in fact be a Vulcan.

We were wrong!

On her connection to Vulcan, she said, “I have the Vulcan conflict in my life from Sarek and Amanda so there’s always going to be that inner conflict with me.  But I think it’s relatable because we all have some kind of inner conflict going on – who we are versus who we present ourselves to be.  There’s a lot to be discovered.

It might seem a little wanky, but the thing I love about this show is that it feels like the title, Discovery, is about more than just the ship or some ‘meta’ sort of “we’re out here discovering things” vibe.  It seems like the title runs through everything, from the intimate lives of each character, to the ‘macro’ stuff of discovering strange new worlds, and new civilisations.

And Captain Lorca?  What about him?  Well, that’s Gabriel Lorca to you.  Yes, he finally has a first name!

We don’t know a great deal about him, other than his name (finally), and the fact that he’s a brilliant military strategist.

Does that give us a hint about the Discovery‘s mission?  Might that add something to the strange markings on the USS Discovery, as visible in the most recent image of the ship?

Close Up of the USS Discovery

Are those markings meant to differentiate the ship from others in Starfleet in some way?  Is the Discovery covert ops?  Was the Shenzhou also covert ops – and is that why the uniforms for both crews are slightly different to what we’re used to – which is, for want of a better term, the exploration arm of Starfleet?  We now know that the Shenzhou is an older ship, so it would be interesting to get a close up of it’s dorsal section to see if it bears similar markings to those on the Discovery.  Could they be from the same fleet… sub-fleet(?) of Starfleet?  There are way too many ‘fleets’ in that sentence!

There is precedent – for there being more than one fleet (that’s an historic precedent) and for differing uniform designs (within Star Trek).

Fleets first… at the moment, the United States maintains seven fleets in its Navy, according to Wikipedia:
– United States Fleet Forces (formerly the Second Fleet, and both Homeland Defence and taking care of the North Atlantic);
– United States Third Fleet (East Pacific);
– United States Fourth Fleet (South Atlantic);
– United States Fifth Fleet (the Middle East);
– United States Sixth Fleet (Europe);
– United States Seventh Fleet (West Pacific), and;
– United States Tenth Fleet (Fleet Cyber Command, and formerly the anti-submarine warfare coordinating organisation).

If Discovery is set in 2255, as has been indicated, that’s 100 years after the events depicted in Star Trek: Enterprise (Seasons 1-4 happen between 2151 and 2155 – with the season 4 finale taking place in 2161), and there could still be a hangover from that pre-Federation era where we had Starfleet and the MACO (Military Assault Command Operations) – both answerable to the government of Earth, but one more militaristic than the other.  Do we know what happened to them?  I know that at some point their responsibilities were passed on to Starfleet Security… but did something survive?  Did the MACO have a new life in between the time of Archer and the time of Kirk?

The uniforms… well, the MACO had a completely different uniform to our friends in Starfleet.  Obviously, two different organisations, but serving the same government.

If the MACO continued in a slightly different form, as a part of Starfleet – as a specialist fleet, might they not have a different uniform?  That’s way out there, because if we were to use the US military as an example, the different fleets mentioned above don’t have different uniforms but this is the 23rd Century!

To me, Starfleet and the MACO are kind of like NASA and the US Military.  NASA is an independent agency of the executive branch of the US Federal Government and is in essence civilian, but it recruits from the military to fill some of its positions.  The US Military are the federal armed forces of the United States and, like NASA, are answerable to the government.  Do we have something similar going on in this era of Star Trek?  Could Burnham, Lorca and Georgiou be part of a new (or old), more military arm of Starfleet?  Hey, I’m doing what fans do.  Divining explanations from random sources to create ‘head-cannon’.

Ah… speculation, my old friend…

But I digress.  We were talking about Captain Lorca before I went on a flight of fancy.

Entertainment Weekly have very generously released the first official image of Captain Gabriel Lorca, on the bridge of the USS Discovery.  We don’t get to see much of the bridge, but we do get Lorca looking every bit a Captain and every bit a man who could most definitely be a military genius.

Jason Isaacs as Captain Gabriel Lorca.jpg

He looks good, hey?

It’s been a really exciting week for news on Discovery.  If any more pops up, we’ll be sure to share it with you here.

If you’d like to check out the Entertainment Weekly exclusive, and subscribe to EW for the actual article when it comes out, click here.

Of interest to some of you, Kirsten Beyer and Ted Sullivan have been getting pretty active on Twitter recently, running non-spoiler Q&As.  If you want to check them out – and I recommend you do – follow @StarTrekRoom (the Star Trek: Discovery Writers Room) and @karterhol (Ted Sullivan).

If you’d like to read the most recent exchange, visit TrekMovie, here.

Now that we’ve seen Jason as Lorca, I am hanging for a new trailer so we can watch him in action and see how he and Sonequa bounce off each other!

I am so excited for this series!  What a cast.  How beautiful does it look?

Star Trek: Discovery airs on CBS (first episode only), CBS All Access, and Space (in Canada) on the 24th of September, and on the 25th of September for Netflix and international audiences.

It stars Sonequa Martin-Green, Jason Isaacs, Michelle Yeoh, Doug Jones, Terry Serpico, Maulik Pancholy, James Frain, Anthony Rapp, Chris Obi, Shazad Latif, Sam Vartholomeos, Mary Chieffo, Kenneth Mitchell, Mary Wiseman, Rekha Sharma, Damon Runyan, Clare McConnell and Rainn Wilson.

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CBS Delivers the Goods

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CBS All Access has finally delivered a brand new trailer for Star Trek: Discovery, giving the world it’s first significant glimpse at the highly anticipated new Star Trek series.

It’s beautiful… surprising… and a little jarring in places, and has me thinking CBS might be up to something completely unexpected.  More on that a little later.

First, an important question was answered by the trailer.  Swimming amongst all of the incredibly beautiful visuals was an announcement from CBS.  The series will air in Autumn (in the United States, which is some time in Spring here in Australia).  The latest word since the trailer went live is that the pilot will be on our screens in September.

Fan reaction to the trailer has been mixed.  Some love it, some don’t, and some were underwhelmed but intrigued.

Why is this trailer dividing fandom so?

I guess because it is unexpected.  We’re often told that it’s never wise to have expectations, but we’re human and whether we consciously realise it or not, we often have them.  I think a lot of us were expecting the new Trek series to look more familiar, and for things to resemble (in a modernised way) what we saw in “The Cage” and “The Menagerie”, which fall in the specified time period.  FYI, “The Cage” was set in 2254 and the year 2255 has often been bandied about when discussing when this new show takes place.

That’s not what we got.  There are slight similarities in the overall design of the sets, and there is an echo of Star Trek: EnterpriseStar Trek: The Original Series and even the first six films in the look of the ships, but everything (except for the uniforms) is a little more ‘Kelvinesque’ than I think any of us expected.  Looking at this trailer, you wouldn’t automatically place the new series between the first prequel and the original 1960s show.

As much as I hate to admit it, that’s probably a wise choice because modern audiences are more familiar with the Kelvin-universe Trek.  To survive, our beloved Star Trek needs to keep attracting new fans (and younger fans) and to do so it needs to appeal to a 21st Century aesthetic.  The uniforms and starship sets we saw in “The Cage” or even Kirk’s “Where No Man Has Gone Before” don’t cut it.

The good news is, the sets do look like they belong in the Star Trek universe.

The uniforms?  I don’t know.  They echo, slightly (very slightly), those from Star Trek: Enterprise, but in no way resemble Pike or Kirk’s era.  I have to admit, I love them.  I think they look incredible and are my favourite uniform design to date, but they are very different.  I think many of us were expecting an approach similar to the one taken by J.J. Abrams and his design team when they updated the original uniforms for the 2009 reboot, but… no.

All of these adjustments have me wondering “is CBS planning to reboot Star Trek entirely?”

Lieutenant Commander Burnham - Environment Suit in Deep Space

Those of us who have been fans of Star Trek for a long time love the original 1960s series, and we accept without issue that it’s dated.  We forgive, for example, the sexism, knowing Gene wasn’t a sexist, and we understand that the series was a product of its time.  New viewers not steeped in Star Trek history would find some episodes of TOS quaint at best and mildly offensive at worst, and they would find the ‘look’ of the series silly.  Even Star Trek: The Next Generation and it’s spin-offs are dated now.  Some of the episodes are a little on the sexist side and their desk top computers, for example, are bigger than our current iPads and tablets, and the graphics we see every day on our smartphones are better than the graphics presented in TNG, DS9 and VOY.

Sadly, sometimes science fiction just ages poorly.  One of the few exceptions to that rule is 2001: A Space Odyssey.  Kubrick went to extreme lengths to project forward into the future, and he and his design team did an incredible job.

What I’m about to suggest is pure speculation and I have no evidence or inside information to suggest my theory holds water, but what if they were thinking of rebooting everything?

What if they wanted to modernise Trek in its entirety to ensure it remained relevant well into the future?

Star Trek: Discovery could be the first step.  We’ve just heard that the show’s first season has been extended to 15 episodes (from 13), so if it gets seven seasons (which was once the average for a Star Trek series), that’s a total of 105 episodes if each season is granted 15 episodes.  The creative team could then jump forward to the TOS era, recast Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Scotty, Sulu, Chekov, Chapel and Rand (again), select 15 of the best episodes from each of the three seasons, update everything in alignment with this new design aesthetic, and make the original crew’s stories more relevant or at least more palatable to a 21st Century audience.

I know, heresy, but bear with me.  Next, they could do another 30 episodes (two seasons) so Kirk and Co. could finish their historic five-year mission.  That’s not seven seasons, but if the creative team wanted to, they could take a look at what happened to the crew in the years between the end of that mission and the crew confronting V’Ger.  There’s another 30 episodes equalling a unique two seasons of Trek, the likes of which we’ve never seen before.

Then the creative team could jump the series ahead to the USS Enterprise B and look at the adventures of Captain John Harriman, First Officer Janice Rand, and Demora Sulu.  I’d watch that and I’d love it.  Next up, we could finally spend some time with Captain Rachel Garrett and the USS Enterprise C, a captain and a ship that has captured the imaginations of Trek fans since they both first appeared in the TNG episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise”.

By then, we might be ready for a new look at TNG era Trek.  The creative team could select 15 of the best episodes from each season of TNG, DS9 and VOY with new actors playing our favourite characters, and give us something intense and mind-blowing.  Could you imagine DS9 starting out with the necessary world-building required of a series that is still unique when compared with its companion shows, and in those first 15 episodes introduce us to the station and the tragedy of the Bajoran occupation (which is still timely and relevant in today’s terrorism affected world) before shifting into the arrival of the Dominion and that eventual war?  Watching that war build over 90 episodes would be amazing.  Can you imagine correcting some of the mistakes of Star Trek: Voyager?  We could have more conflict with the Maquis as they try to unite the crews, we could redo the Kazon and make them a decent nemesis (with better hair), and we could even dedicate an entire 15 episode season to some of the stronger stories like the “The Year of Hell”.  Finally, just imagine for a moment what the writers could do with Picard, Beverly, Riker, Deanna, Worf, Data, Geordi, Wesley and Guinan in a more condensed and focused set of episodes season after season?  That’s exciting.  Such iconic characters, who often weren’t given the best treatment or the best stories.

Star Trek: Enterprise?  I don’t think they’d need to touch that.  I think it still stands the test of time and fits in with this new vision that is being presented to us.

After that?

As Jean-Luc Picard says in Star Trek: First Contact, “plenty of letters left in the alphabet.”

It’s an intriguing idea.  At the risk of having multiple Trekkies boycott Star Trek: Sentinel forever, I wouldn’t be opposed to it.

However… I digress.

Back to Star Trek: Discovery.

First Impressions?
I seem to be one of the few fans who out and out loved the two trailers I saw.  Two?  Yep.  The first trailer I was able to watch was the CBS All Access version.  I went back to watch it a second time and grab some screencaps only to discover it had been region-blocked.

Just as an aside, region-blocking really pisses me off.  This is the 21st Century.  I should be able to access the content I want to access, regardless of where I am in the world.

In its place, international audiences could watch the Netflix version which came with subtitles.  At least the one I saw did.

That’s the trailer I’ll primarily be reflecting on, because it’s the one I’ve been able to watch multiple times (and grab screencaps from).

With both trailers I was blown away by the cinematic visuals.  They are beautiful and this show looks like a lot of money has been spent on it.  As grumpy as I got with CBS in my last post, I can now see that the extra time has been well spent.

The big thing that grabbed me with both trailers was Sonequa Martin-Green.  Holy %#*@!  She is incredible.  She can and will carry this series and make it something special.  I watched the second trailer multiple times because of her.  Yes, I loved a lot of what I saw, but every time she was on screen I was captivated.

So, having disclosed that I loved the trailer, I do need to say that it was… jarring.

STDSC Screenshot 1

We don’t see the Discovery, but we do get to see a few exterior shots of the Shenzhou and a corridor and the bridge of that ship.  There are, as I mention above, some design elements that place it in the prime timeline, but graphics wise it evokes the Kelvin timeline more than Pike’s era.

In what I think is a clever move, they’ve grounded these changes with a few old school Trek elements – the original communicators are back, we have a jazzed-up original series transporter effect, and desert robes reminiscent of those worn by Sisko and Dax in season seven of DS9.  That’s not original series, but it is Star Trek.

Some critics are saying the desert robes are a bit Star Wars, and they do have a point, but when I first saw the trailer and the below image, I immediately went to season seven of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in my head.

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The new Statfleet uniforms are beautiful, but instead of the familiar gold, red and blue/teal that we’ve seen in every incarnation of Star Trek, it appears a more metallic theme will delineate the various departments in Starfleet, with gold, silver and bronze shoulder stripes, shirt side panels and pant stripes all the rage ten years before Kirk.

That’s quite a change!

The uniforms and vessel design choices aren’t the most jarring thing though.  They didn’t ‘break’ me out of the trailer.  The Klingons did, and Lieutenant Saru did.

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Lieutenant Saru and Lieutenant Commander Burnham

The Klingons are familiar, but far more bestial than we’re used to.  They look mean and I loved this deepening of their look. Their outfits/uniforms/ceremonial wear(?) is far more elaborate than what we have ever seen before and I didn’t like them.  I hope that what they are wearing is ceremonial only, and that we get to see something appropriately vicious and lethal for their regular uniforms.

Lieutenant Saru?

He looks amazing.  My first thought was “poor Doug”, because that makeup looks like it would take hours.

My second thought, thanks to the dialogue spoken by Saru, was… WTF?!

The dialogue I remember was from the first trailer.  My memory may be a bit off, but Saru tells us that his race was genetically engineered for one purpose, to sense the coming of death.

Why?  Seriously, why??  There is no point to that.

It’s the only part of the trailer that really disappointed me.  Why would someone engineer a race to detect the coming of death?  How limiting is this going to be for the character?  I love Deanna Troi, but is this going to be another case of “Captain… I sense… (cue ominous music) the coming of death!” episode after episode?

I hope they reloop that dialogue to be “one of the things my species was designed to detect is the coming of death…” which still sucks, but sucks way less than the almost nonsensical “we were made to sense death, dude.”

How is that even possible?

Anyway.  I think you get that I don’t like that!  I actually can’t believe that slipped through, considering the quality of the creative team involved.

The Story?

Not a clue.

It seems like it will be epic.  There’s a big Klingon sarcophagus thing, Klingon ships attacking, Sarek training or mentoring our heroine, and the insinuation something big is happening out on the edge of known space.

The only thing we can guess at is that the Shenzhou awakens something that I assume Discovery will have to deal with.  I am worried that whatever the Shenzhou awakens will kill Captain Georgiou.  I hope not.  That would be a waste of such an incredible actor.  Watch the trailer, you’ll see why I’m concerned.  Think about what and who we don’t see.

It looks like it’s the Klingons that have been ‘awakened’ out on the fringe, so I’m wondering if this is a special type of Klingon… perhaps a genetic experiment gone wrong?  Or maybe it’s an exiled colony?  That might explain the different look and the unusual costumes.

The Effects?

Outstanding.  I don’t need to say anything else.  They are feature film quality.  Bravo CBS.  There’s nothing like that on TV right now.

The Characters?

We don’t get to see a lot of them.  We see Captain Philippa Georgiou, Saru, Connor, Burnham and Sarek, and a few of the Klingons, but that’s it.

The only character we get any insight into is Burnham, and then there are only insinuations.

I was left wondering is she Vulcan?  Is she a human adopted by Vulcans?  She seems to have a very close relationship with Sarek.

She also seems a lot more impulsive than your standard Starfleet officer.

Is it True to Star Trek?

I think it is.

There are design choices that are a little disorienting, but overall it ‘feels’ right.  From the tiny bit of dialogue we get, it seems like the writers and producers have tried very hard to honour Gene Roddenberry’s legacy.  You’d expect nothing less with Rod Roddenberry involved.

If you haven’t seen the trailer yet, watch it.  You’re in for a treat.  Try to let go of your expectations, and once you do, you might be surprised by how much you enjoy it.

One more little note, CBS All Access has announced an “aftershow” special that will air after every episode of the series.  It’s called “Talking Trek“.

Now… screencaps.

In the screencaps below, it’s implied that the child Sarek is talking to is Burnham.  The child has a Vulcan haircut, but I don’t know if she’s Vulcan.  We never really get a good look at her ears.

As you can see below, the bridge looks a little Star Trek: Enterprise and a little USS Kelvin too.  The graphics?  Very Kelvin timeline.

Check out how awesome Saru looks!  In the CBS All Access trailer Saru says the thing about his species being designed to sense the coming of death.  Then he pauses for a bit and says “I sense the coming of death.  I sense it coming now.”

The first image below is a Klingon hand.  Nice and savage looking.  Check out the Klingon uniforms… really ornate and unusual.  They look super uncomfortable and not something you’d wear into battle.

That’s it.

It ends with the logo we’ve come to know and love.

In addition to the trailer, CBS have released an official poster for the series.  If you look closely, you’ll see the Discovery.

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If you haven’t seen the trailer or want to watch it again, you can check it out on YouTube here.

It’s so exciting to be getting something concrete from this production.  We should be in for an interesting next few months.

One last thought.  If you look at the poster, it indicates the Vulcans are going to play a big part in this series.  I don’t think Burnham doing the Vulcan salute is without meaning.  Is it a clue to her heritage?  Is it an indication this new series will pick up on some elements from around Archer’s time?

There is still so much to learn about this show, and the trailer has definitely got me primed for more.

As news breaks, we’ll post about it.

Now do what I’m doing and heave a big sigh of relief.  Star Trek: Discovery is really happening.

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A Future To Believe In

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Now that Star Trek is officially 50 years old (having celebrated its actual birthday a few days ago), it’s a good time for a die hard Trekker to reflect on his or her love of that particular universe – and why it continues to mean something to them years after their first exposure to it.

I’ve been in the middle of that process for a few months now, ever since the announcement of Star Trek: Discovery.  The recent release of Star Trek Beyond intensified it for me, and I decided to start talking to other Trekkers to see if I could find a common theme around what makes so many of us love Star Trek and keep loving it.

What I learned was Star Trek does two things really well, and both of those things resonate strongly with long-term fans:

  1. Star Trek shows us a future that’s worth fighting for, that’s worth dreaming about, and that’s worth wanting to help shape, and;
  2. Star Trek is a really intimate and personal experience for every single person who loves it, and that, possibly, is it’s greatest magic.

That second point is a frustrating one if you’re a show runner.  Star Trek does have a formula of sorts, but it’s a really hard one to get right.  Without exception, fans want challenging storylines that are provocative and insightful – which is scary for a show that needs to make money because, as Gene Roddenberry learned the hard way, you’re bound to piss someone off and risk alienating a segment of your audience.  Fans want a meaningful relationship with the characters which means you must get two things right straight off the bat – the writers room and the casting process.  Fans want it a little dark without losing the hopeful future Star Trek promises us… and despite craving intelligent science fiction we want that science fiction all wrapped up with pretty action set pieces that are full of amazing (and expensive) visual effects.

I’ve spoken to a lot of people about Star Trek these last few months, and for every single person there was always a deeply personal story attached to their love… “Star Trek was my ‘safe space’ when I broke up with my husband…” “Star Trek got me through bullying when I was a kid…” “Star Trek is what got me into the military…” “Star Trek was the thing that helped me set my moral compass…”

Those often amazing conversations showed me that while all of the above about challenging storylines and great VFX is true, the actual core ingredients are the characters and their dynamic.

Star Trek has a ‘secret sauce’, and that ‘sauce’ is its characters who are our conduit into that universe and it’s vision for tomorrow.

What I loved most, while talking to fellow fans, was that the characters who resonated with them weren’t always the obvious ones.  Yes, I heard a lot of Kirk love, Spock love, McCoy love, Picard love, Data love, Siski, Kira, Janeway, Seven, Archer, T’Pol and Trip love, but I also heard a lot of Sulu, Uhura, Chekov, Scotty, Geordi, Beverly, Deanna, Wesley, Quark, Jake, Odo, Dax, Chakotay, the Doctor, B’Elanna, Kes, Neelix, Harry, Hoshi, Malcolm, Phlox and Mayweather love.

In the original series, some of those characters never got the chance to say more than “Aye sir,” and “Hailing frequencies open, Captain,” yet they still effected people – and more often than not, deeply.  Why?  Because they were representative.  Sometimes in obvious ways – Uhura was a woman in a position of power and a black woman at that, Sulu was an Asian who wasn’t a normal 1960s stereotype, and Chekov was a Russian at a time when the US and Russia didn’t have a lot of love for each other… but they weren’t just representative in that way.  Uhura was an expert and a woman in command who could come out and honestly say “Captain, I’m frightened.”  Chekov was a whiz kid whose emotions were always written clearly on his face.  Sulu had a cheeky and sometimes sardonic sense of humour that now and again seemed to say “you’re a complete dick, Captain.”  Watch some of the original episodes and listen to Sulu’s responses to Kirk or Scotty when they give a command that seems to defy common sense.  Both Uhura and Chekov do that at times also.  These characters were representative of real emotion, sometimes overtly expressed, sometimes subtlety conveyed, and we fell in love with them because of that.

Those human moments in a show that was so different to anything else on television, delivered by personalities we could relate to, gave us an ‘in’ to Gene Roddenberry’s universe.

For me, it was McCoy, Uhura and Spock.  They were my pathway into the original Star Trek.  Beverly, Deanna, Wesley and Geordi my conduits into Next Gen.  Jadzia and Bashir my way into DS9.  Janeway, Kes, Chakotay and the Doctor my door into Voyager, and T’Pol, Phlox and Malcolm my way into Enterprise.  Each of those characters had qualities I possessed or aspired to possess and they resonated with me and still do today.

I grew up in the sort of neighbourhood where every week someone was stabbed, bashed, and in someway victimised, and as a child I needed something that showed me a future full of intelligent, compassionate people who fought to get rid of those horrific things from people’s lives.

When I was bullied at school, Star Trek was my retreat.  I could lose myself in that world and dream of a future that was brighter than the one I saw for myself.

As I hit my teenage years and then adult years, Star Trek started to shape my morals as a person and many of the idealistic concepts in Star Trek still guide me today – particularly IDIC and the idea that we are stronger together.

I became an actor in my late teens because I wanted to go to Los Angeles and get cast in Star Trek.  I did make it to Los Angeles, but never got the chance to be in Star Trek because I made it there a year or two after Enterprise went off the air.

I became a professional Counsellor because of Deanna Troi.  Even though I’m a guy, Deanna and her profession spoke to me and though we barely ever got to see her do any real work as a psychologist, I still invoke her preternatural calm and warmth when working with clients.

I’ve always known that Star Trek was one of the most important influences in my life, but I’d never really spent a great deal of time wondering why.

This year seemed to demand it, and I’m glad I spent a little time exploring and reflecting on what Star Trek means to me and why it’s still the world I retreat into when I need to recharge.

There are so many quotes and examples I could provide to illustrate all the ways in which Star Trek has affected me, too many actually, so instead I’ll just choose a few…

Kirk’s statement in The Final Frontier, that he needs his pain.  That speech still effects me to this day.  Our pain, our failures, and how we deal with them all, defines us.  There are so many experiences in my life that I wish had never happened to me, but I cannot deny their impact and how they have strengthened and shaped me.

Kira’s dedication to her spiritual life mirrored my own journey to understand some of the indefinable but poignant experiences we all encounter in life.

It was something similar with Chakotay.  His spiritual life and journey, though often mired in stereotype, was beautiful and I loved that it was included, but the fact he was a physically strong and imposing, but deeply spiritual and sensitive man was what hit me like a sledgehammer.  It hit me deeply, in the same way the startlingly beautiful and noble Uhura did and in the same way the generous, calm and gracious Deanna did.  As a 6’2″ guy who’s been described as physically intimidating, but who is softly spoken and by nature a pretty caring bloke, it was fantastic to see a man on TV who was also all of those things, and who chose to use his presence not to constantly threaten and intimidate but to nurture and support.  It was what I needed to see and it came at a time in my life where I was in danger of going off the rails.

You might be thinking… “hold on, what about Riker?”

Will was always a little too ‘big’ a personality for me to connect with.

Star Trek is unique in its ability to craft characters that are universal but speak to each individual viewer.  If there’s one thing the creative teams behind each show and movie did really well, it was creating characters we can relate to.  I don’t know if they consciously tried to do that, but that’s what they did.

Each series and each film had its ups and downs story wise, but the characters were always exceptional.  Yes, Kes didn’t have a lot of room to grow and Neelix had the odd issue and could be pretty damn annoying, but by and large the characters are the thing that makes Star Trek shine.  At least in my opinion.

As we look forward to Star Trek: Discovery, with each of us no doubt carrying a small wish list around in our minds, I personally hope that the creative team behind the new series get the fact that no matter what, the characters are our way into this new version of the universe, and that Star Trek really is an important and intimate experience for each of us and that needs to be respected.

Yes, we want great stories and we want allegory and we want brilliant special effects, but if Star Trek is to succeed it needs incredible characters and it needs a way to inspire hope in us and allow us to link with the show in a way that is meaningful.  It needs to be something that mirrors all of us, in some way, and tries hard to be relevant to this generation of young people as they look around for heroes to aspire to be like.

Star Trek is important.  It’s important to me, it’s no doubt important to you if you’re reading this, and it’s important to the world.

What do we have on television now?  Zombie hunters who are now borderline sociopaths, families warring over a stupid iron throne and committing atrocious acts in their quest for power, families backstabbing each other over musical empires or political ambitions… there’s not a lot of hope, and there aren’t many shows demonstrating a different, better way to be.

Star Trek did that, and it can do it again.

I hope Bryan and Alex and everyone else involved with Star Trek: Discovery truly appreciate just how important Star Trek is at both that personal, intimate level, and that much bigger, aspirational level.

Bryan has said the world needs Star Trek now more than it ever has, so I think he does get it.  I hope he is able to realise his vision with the amazing creative team he’s assembled.

So thank you, Star Trek.  Thank you for shaping me, and for shaping so many amazing people I’ve met, and thank you for not being frightened of shining a light in the darkness – even when shining that light hasn’t been popular.

I’ve had enough of the depressing, sarcastic, angst-filled shows on television these days.  So many are so devoid of hope it’s depressing.  I need and I want something that challenges me intellectually, and I need and I want something that reminds me of just how amazing we are as a species.

The bright future Star Trek describes is the future I want, and it’s a future worth believing in.

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Star Trek Beyond and Series VI Trailers

Star Trek Update Banner - Beyond and Series VI

As anticipation builds for the release of Star Trek Beyond and the sixth live action Star Trek television series, two new trailers have dropped in the space of two days to remind us all that Star Trek is definitely alive and well in this, it’s 50th Anniversary year.

As well as two new trailers, there are two new movie posters, with one of them paying homage to the very first Star Trek movie poster ever, 1977’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

That poster was created by Bob Peak, a very famous Hollywood artist.  You can check out Bob’s work here.

The official Star Trek website has all the news on the two up and coming Trek productions, as well as a special focus on the recent major fan event that was held in Los Angeles on the 20th of May, featuring J.J. Abrams, Justin Lin and some of the stars of Star Trek Beyond.

You can go directly to the report on the special fan event by clicking here if you’re not in the mood to navigate through the site.

Now, let’s talk about the preview for the next film.

Star Trek Beyond Promotional Posters

The new trailer for Star Trek Beyond, and the second official trailer released by Paramount, is AMAZING.

I could break it all down for you, but that would be a waste of time because you really need to watch it.

As a long time fan, it feels like we might finally have a Star Trek feature film to rival the incredibly poignant and powerful Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Whereas the first trailer focused on action, action, action and more action, and had a slightly unexpected soundtrack blare out at us when we hit play, the second trailer takes us on a deeper journey, hinting at a movie that has just as much substance to it as it does noise and bluster.

The action is still there, but more importantly so too are the characters we’ve come to love, and for at least one of them, they’re at something of a crossroads in life that has the potential to add a whole other dimension to the film.

I know that Into Darkness was meant to be something of a homage to The Wrath of Khan, and one that fell short and was ultimately a little misguided, but this preview reminded me of the tone and feel of Wrath of Khan and what made that movie great, and it filled me with a new level of anticipation.

What makes Wrath of Khan so special for me and what makes it my gold standard for Star Trek films, is that the movie has grown with me.  When I first saw it, I wasn’t even a teenager.  At that impressionable age, what stood out was the epic space battle, the Ceti-Eels, Khan and how ruthless he was, and how much the crew of the Enterprise seemed like a family.

As the years have passed, I’ve come to appreciate just how multi-layered the movie is.  Kirk’s musings on life and his angst at being desk bound because he’s so experienced and others feel he should be guiding rather than doing, resonated with me when I found myself at a similar point in my career.  Uhura’s objection to Kirk’s comment that roaming the galaxy is a game for the young, speaks to me because I’m still bucking the fact that while I feel young, I’m actually cruising toward middle age.  These insights into something we all endure, the process of ageing and maturing, make me respond to the movie on a whole other level and look at life in a completely different way.  Kirk’s line, “I feel young”, still moves me to this day and reminds me that at every stage of life every single one of us has something invaluable and unique to offer.  Which, thanks to The Wrath of Khan, has become very much a big part of Star Trek‘s overall philosophy of inclusion.

Beyond appears to riff on similar universal experiences.  Kirk is trying to discover who he is, outside of the shadow of his father.  Spock cautions us on fear.  McCoy reminds us that it’s okay to fear death, so long as we remember to live.  The two plus minute trailer packs a whollop of emotion and action into it, from Uhura’s declaration her friend and Captain will come for her and the crew, to Shohreh Aghdashloo’s counsel on how easy it is to get lost, and her reminder that all we can really depend on in life are the people who undertake the journey with us.  Add to that a villain so steeped in hatred for the Federation and the very vision and ideals we as fans so admire, and the promise of an epic but intimately personal movie is made.

To watch the trailer, click here.

Below are a series of screencaps from the preview.  The first five photos show a pensive Kirk as he ponders what it means to ‘be’ Jim Kirk.  There’s also a unique shot of the Enterprise departing what might be the Yorktown, a starbase somewhere far from Earth.  We also see the first real new warp effect since the first movie in the reboot timeline – and it’s beautiful.  The screencap does not do it justice.  In any way.

The next five shots show the crew setting out, the attack by the swarm that cripples or destroys Enterprise, and a fantastic new shot of the deadly new enemy as they board the ship.

The following screencaps show what happens when you piss off a certain Communications Officer, McCoy following Jim’s order to abandon ship, and Kirk on the ground aiming a phaser at someone out of shot.

The next images show us that Uhura and Spock’s relationship is still going strong, that Spock and McCoy continue to rub each other the wrong way, and hints that Uhura and a great many of the Enterprise‘s crew fall into the hands of the film’s new villain, Krall.

The final screencaps show us an enemy learning all he can about James T. Kirk, Uhura warning that villain that their captain will come for them and he won’t be in a merciful mood, and two shots of the new heroine – Jaylah, played by Sofia Boutella.

One of the most surprising things about the new trailer was the ship it appears the Enterprise crew escapes in.

An NX class starship, last seen in Star Trek: Enterprise.  Could it be the USS Franklin?  The images below are grainy, but I swear it’s an NX vessel.  Watch the preview, and let me know if you agree!

All in all, this preview looks incredible.  I think Justin Lin has done it.

I was already excited to see this film, now I’m crazy-impatient to see it.  I can’t wait for the Australian premiere.  I’ll be lining up early and going multiple times.

Thank you, Paramount, Justin Lin, Simon Pegg and Doug Jung for what looks like it will be one of the best Star Trek films in a very long time, and maybe the best Star Trek film ever.

Star Trek Series VI Logo

A couple of days before the second official preview for Beyond broke, equally exciting news hit Star Trek fandom.

A teaser trailer for the new television series.

The trailer doesn’t show us anything, other than the beautiful new logo for the new production and a few gorgeous shots of Earth and deep space.

But, it does possibly answer one question many of us have been asking for a few weeks now – will the new Trek be an anthology show?

The answer is in the screencaps below.

New CREWS?  It doesn’t say, outright, that the new series will be an anthology series, but that’s one heck of a strong hint.

The last four screencaps from the teaser promise us new villains, new heroes and new worlds.

And I can’t wait!

After watching the teaser, I was left thinking that if it is an anthology series, it won’t just jump backward and forwards along one Trek timeline – it will also visit the alternate timeline created in 2009 by J.J. Abrams.

I have nothing to base that on, other than a lense flare effect I saw as I was watching the trailer that made me think of J.J..

When you think about it, it’s a simple way to meet every fans expectations.  A lot of fans prefer what is called the Prime Timeline, and some prefer what’s often called the AbramsVerse.  As well as honouring both, an anthology series opens up some very interesting story ideas as the writers explore Trek’s lengthy prime history across the 22nd, 23rd and 24th centuries, and how similar events might play out differently in the alternate timeline created by Nero.

The more I think about it, the more I hope they go the anthology route.

Things are starting to get very exciting for fans, and finally it’s starting to feel like the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek.

As more news comes to light, I’ll pop it up here… but right now, I’m  just going to pop up that beautiful homage to Star Trek: The Motion Picture one more time because I am in love with the new Beyond poster.

Star Trek Beyond Star Trek The Motion Picture Homage

Star Trek Beyond stars Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg, John Cho, Anton Yelchin, Sofia Boutella and Idris Elba, and was written by Simon Pegg and Doug Jung and directed by Justin Lin.

Star Trek Series VI is being developed by Alex Kurtzman, Bryan Singer, Rod Roddenberry, Heather Kadin, Trevor Roth and Nicholas Meyer.

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Star Trek: Horizon – Review

Star Trek Horizon Title

The first thing I have to say about Star Trek Horizon is… Bryan Fuller, give Tommy Kraft a job.  Now.

Big thanks to Paul for suggesting I review this film, because Star Trek Horizon is really good!  In many many ways, it’s outstanding.

I’d started to watch it a few days ago, and would have probably put off viewing the last hour until the upcoming Easter long weekend, but Paul’s message made me think I should do it a bit earlier – and I’m very glad I did.  What I had seen in the first 30 or so minutes had blown me away, but I had decided it could wait.  Silly decision.  This passion project deserves as much buzz as we can all give it and it deserves to have the fan community drown it in a lot of love.

Horizon is a beautiful, impressive production, and that’s before you take into account the fact it was done on a shoe-string budget with a tiny crew led by one dynamic man: Tommy Kraft.

Star Trek Horizon raised $22,600 to produce the 1 hour 40 minute feature.  I’m sure Tommy probably put some of his own money into it too, but the fact is this amazing film was done at a bare fraction of the cost of most other high quality fan productions!

Tommy Kraft and the Crew of Discovery

Star Trek Horizon is set in the 22nd Century during the same time period as Captain Archer’s USS Enterprise NX-01, but is set after the conclusion of that shows fourth season.

The film takes place during the Romulan War, as a fledgling Coalition of Planets tries to bring multiple disparate races together in an attempt to push back the expansion plans of the mysterious Romulan Star Empire.

Starfleet receives intelligence from a Romulan defector about a weapon of mass destruction that’s about to come on line and sends the USS Discovery NX-04, the Enterprise, and two Vulcan ships to stop it.

In the middle of all of that, the Discovery is sucked through time and onto the doorstep of one of the major players in the Temporal Cold War.

Visually, this film is superb.  It’s professional, stylish and bold.

The story is strong, the special effects are feature quality, the pacing is good (at times brilliant), and the direction is beautiful.  Tommy Kraft has a great eye for visual story-telling.

When I applied a critical eye to the film, I counted only three scenes where I questioned what Tommy was up to – but instead of thinking them poor choices, wondered instead if those choices were made out of necessity because of green screen constraints.

Most of the live action is shot against green screen, and as an actor who has done green screen work on a science fiction television series, I can say it’s a pain in the ass.  As an actor your imagination is already a finely tuned machine, so green screen isn’t horrible because it forces you to imagine an entire 3D environment, it’s horrible because it’s disorienting.  At least, I’ve found it that way.

Horizon Green Screen Work

When the camera isn’t running or a rehearsal isn’t happening, you are totally snapped out of the moment by studio walls or whatever is around you.  When you’re on a physical set or are shooting scenes on location, it’s easier to reorient yourself emotionally (as well as physically), so you can pull all of the pieces of your performance back together after a break.  So, to say I’m impressed with the acting in Horizon is an understatement.  Some of the performances waver at times and are a little flat, but overall they’re strong – and I hate to harp on about green screen, but the fact these actors were all performing in an environment that was nothing like what we see on the screen, is a testament to them.

Of the actors, there were three stand out performances: Paul Lang as Harrison Hawke – the main character in the film, Jeannine Thompson as Amelia Yarris (Harrison’s love interest), and Marc Bowers as First Officer Jackson Gates.

As I said, all of the actors were very good, at times bordering on excellent, but Paul, Jeannine and Marc mesmerized me every time they came on screen.

There is so much that is good about Star Trek Horizon I actually don’t know where to begin.  The film isn’t perfect, but it’s better than quite a few of the episodes from the various professional Star Trek series’, and it’s actually better than a couple of the feature films.

One of the things I loved most about the film were the casting choices.

Tommy Kraft is a young man, and it would have been easy to get a bunch of young friends together to make up the crew of the USS Discovery NX-04 or to choose only young professional actors.  Instead, there are a number of ages represented, which adds massive layers of realism to the show.  I believed these characters.  I believed they were the best of the best and had fought their way up through multiple missions to be the command crew of a starship.

In a fanfilm set in a universe as well known and as loved as Star Trek‘s, if you don’t have familiar characters or actors to ground your production, it can be harder for an audience to invest in what’s happening on the screen.  Tommy brought together a group of actors who have enough chemistry together that it made me want to watch them and want to accept them into my favourite universe.  There was no gimmick casting, and no recasting of familiar roles.  The whole film is a bold step in a brand new direction and I loved that.

Another thing I loved was the fact Tommy is also an incredibly self-aware director.  He knew he was making a film that would rely heavily on green screen, and he made brilliant choices as a result.  The film is seamless, and that takes a lot of talent.

To mask the superimposition, Tommy chose to apply what looks like a slight gauze effect or filter to the principal photography.  It’s a smart choice, because it softens everything and tricks the eye without being overly distracting.  I genuinely had a difficult time picking the green screen shots – even though I knew most of them were done in his parents’ basement and not on a built set.

Some people might find the slight blur the filter creates annoying, but it adds a particular ‘gloss’ to the production that you do see in some American series.  At times I did find myself craving sharper images, but thankfully we do get them with all of the space battles and star ship shots and during some scenes filmed on actual location.

Despite the praise I’m throwing all over this fanfilm, and the simple fact I really enjoyed it, Horizon has a handful of minor issues.

If I want to get specific about things that didn’t quite work for me, I need to go into spoiler territory.

Spoiler Alert

1. We get too much Harrison.  Tommy and his team assembled a strong cast of actors to play well realised characters, but it felt like we didn’t get to spend enough time with any of them.  I wanted to know more about Jackson, Francis, Tom, Marie, Amelia and T’Mar.  We learn a little bit about T’Mar and Amelia, and both those women’s stories drive Horizon forward, but we don’t spend any where near enough time with them.  Unfortunately, character development was one of the very few weaknesses in the film.  Considering the story, there probably wasn’t any other choice.  This was a film, not a two-hour pilot, though I so deeply wish it was a two-hour pilot.  I’d watch that series.

Another quibble about Harrison is he talked a lot.  I mean A LOT.  Some of his dialogue, like how tired he and everyone else was, was unnecessary.  There’s a cardinal rule in writing: Show, don’t tell.  The actor showed his characters weariness effectively.  He didn’t need to mention how fed up and exhausted he and everyone else was as often as he did.  We saw it in him and all of the others, and the story effectively alluded to that fact at multiple points.

2. T’Mar.  I loved the character, and Callie Bussell is great as the Romulan defector… but she’s a Romulan defector.  Though she comes to the Coalition of Planets (precursor to the United Federation of Planets) having already been altered by surgery, and there is no reference to the joint heritage of Vulcans and Romulans that is made on screen, I find it really hard to believe the Chief Medical Officer of the Discovery wouldn’t have examined T’Mar after they liberated her (the first time we see Discovery they’re returning from the mission to get T’Mar), or that Starfleet wouldn’t have grilled the beJesus out of her to learn as much as they could about their implacable foe, before letting a Romulan become a part of the crew of Discovery.

That bugged me.

We’re not meant to learn what Romulans look like until the original series episode “Balance of Terror”, and though Horizon doesn’t directly break that continuity rule, logic (no pun intended) suggests it’s happened.

There’s no indication the Coalition and Starfleet know Vulcans and Romulans are essentially the space species after meeting T’Mar, but it stretches belief just a little if we just assume the crew of the Discovery or Starfleet didn’t find anything suspicious when examining her.  And she would have been examined.  At this point in Trek history the Romulans were the greatest threat to peace in the known galaxy.

3. The ending.  Hawke confronts the big bad guy behind the plot to destroy Earth, and then just shoots him.  Which is funny, and reminded me of that scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark where Indy does something similar, but I don’t think the scene in Horizon was meant to be humorous.  The movie doesn’t end there, so it’s not the ultimate climax… but it felt like it should have been more of one.  The bad dude just went down way too easily and it kind of lessened the impact of some of what he’d been up to and the role he played in the Temporal Cold War.

The film does ends satisfactorily, and more importantly it ends leaving me wanting more, so I can forgive that.

So three not so great things vs way too many amazing things to mention.  That’s not bad.

Now, I’m going to geek out a bit!

I might be one of the very few Trek fans who loved the Temporal Cold War story line in Star Trek: Enterprise.  I was really disappointed when it kind of just died out.  I’m also aware I’m in the minority when it comes to fans who love Enterprise more than most of the other Trek shows.

To see the Temporal Cold War story line taken up again – and to have it conclude in a way that made sense to me, because I always thought future Romulans were behind it all, was thrilling and satisfying.

I loved that Tommy dovetailed the destruction of Romulus in 2009s Star Trek into this film, and made it fit with the arc of the Temporal Cold War.  That is excellent story telling.

Also, seeing the Enterprise and Discovery in battle with two Vulcan cruisers against a bunch of Romulans was way too sweet a thing!

I was also very happy to see the Iconians make an appearance – and in a way that made sense.  I have to give Tommy additional credit for writing an excellent script and crafting a sensible story that was very Star Trek.

There’s so much to like about Horizon… the music, the editing, the characters, the costumes… I could go on.

This movie is an amazing achievement and Tommy, as the director and writer and executive producer, has proven without question how incredibly talented he is.

If I could get a hold of the guys behind Star Trek: Renegades, I’d beg them to take Tommy on board – along with his team of special effects and editing wizards.  Horizon’s seamless superimposition work shames similar work done by Renegades – and they had more money, and his eye for action is so amazing.  I’d love to see Tommy direct an episode of Renegades.

In fact, many of the special effect visuals and the angles and camera pacing that Tommy chooses shames most of the actual Trek films.  There are some shots – like the Discovery spinning out of warp near Saturn at the beginning of the film – that are mind blowing.

If you’re a Star Trek fan, you have to watch this movie.  It really is something special.

Star Trek Horizon stars Paul Lang as Harrison Hawke, Marc Bowers as Jackson Gates, Jeannine Thompson as Amelia Yarris, Tom McClure as Tom Samuels, Ryan Webber as Francis Brookes, Callie Bussell as T’Mar, and Ashley Croft as Marie Sutherland.

To watch Star Trek Horizon and visit their official website, click here.

To learn the names of all the amazing people behind this film and its production, click here.

To learn more about Tommy Kraft and the work he does as a professional storyteller, visit his website here.

Star Trek Horizon gets four and a half Starfleet Delta’s out of five!

4.5 Deltas

I’m serious, if Bryan Fuller doesn’t give this guy a job, he’s nuts.

Tommy, you’ll probably never read this, but if you do – please make more Star Trek.

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Bryan Fuller Becomes Co-Creator of New Trek Series

Bryan Fuller Produces Star Trek

A couple of weeks ago, The Official Star Trek website let us know who would be co-creating the new Star Trek series alongside Alex Kurtzman.

Bryan Fuller.

Bryan is a Trek veteran, having launched his career writing episodes of both Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager.

Bryan has been attempting to convince CBS to let him have a go at a new Trek show for years – and finally, his persistence (and enthusiasm) has paid off!

The sixth live action Star Trek television series will follow in the footsteps of the original Star TrekStar Trek: The Next GenerationStar Trek: Deep Space NineStar Trek: Voyager, and Star Trek: Enterprise – we just don’t know where in Trek’s timeline the new series will take place, or whether or not it will even be in the same prime reality as those shows, or the alternate reality launched in 2009 with J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek film.

When you give a bit of thought to this announcement, you can’t help but think it’s an interesting mix.  Bryan’s history is in the prime universe, and Alex’s is in the alternate universe, so can we risk a guess as to which reality this new live series will take place in?  Chances are, this mix is the answer we’ve been looking for.

One of the predominate rumours floating around the internet is that the sixth live series will be an alternate universe version of Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Bryan Fuller definitely understands that time period, having worked on two shows that took place in the 24th Century.

Could bringing Bryan on board mean there’s some merit to that rumour?

I held off on reporting Bryan’s addition to the creative team in the hopes more information on the series would be forthcoming – but it wasn’t, so it looks like CBS will continue drip-feeding us bits and pieces as they see fit.

No matter what, this is a positive move on the part of the production.  Brian’s list of creative credits is impressive, and he has been behind some of the more exciting TV offerings that have shown up on our screens in recent years.

To read the official announcement from CBS click here.

To check out Bryan’s credits as a writer and producer, go to his Wikipedia page here and his IMDb page here.

The best thing about this announcement is that Bryan is a fan.  I feel like his involvement guarantees the material will be treated with the respect we all feel it deserves.

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